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I am working on a linux bash script that is run and receives variables from from CSF Firewall. The command that CSF Firewall issues is system($config{RT_ACTION},$ip,$check,$block,$cnt,$mails); where $config{RT_ACTION} is the path to my script.

$mails=2013-04-16 11:57:14 1US8Fq-0001VC-Uu <= from@domain.com H=reverse.trace.of.ipaddress (server) [xxx.xxx.xxx.xxx]:PORT I=[xxx.xxx.xxx.xxx]:PORT P=esmtp S=5964 id=SOMEIDHERE$@com T="EMAILSUBJECT" from <from@domain.com> for to@domain.com

The problem comes when I try to run this command to get from@domain.com.

DUMPED=$5
myvar=$(echo "$DUMPED" | awk '{print $5}')

If its not clear, $mails is passed to my script which translates to $5 and the information that I want to extract with awk is located in the 5th column which also translates to $5 so instead of $5 outputting from@domain.com it outputs the full content of $mails. What am I missing? Why won't awk set myvar to from@domain.com?

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up vote 0 down vote accepted

What about:

DUMPED=$5
myvar=`echo $DUMPED | cut -d" " -f5`

or, using AWK:

DUMPED=$5
myvar=`echo $DUMPED | awk '{print $5}'`

It worked for me...

share|improve this answer
    
Actually, a pipe implies a subshell, as does your capturing expression with backticks. (Backticks are synonymous with $().) – kojiro Apr 16 '13 at 23:43
    
Thats true, its just that im used to call $( "subshell operator" and ` just "backtick operator"... :D – user435943 Apr 16 '13 at 23:49
    
the second solution works perfectly! Thanks for that! – hiphopsmurf Apr 16 '13 at 23:55

Hopefully some of this is illustrative. Ultimately, I'm just showing that what you have already works, unless you're trying to define the variable literally with the dollar sign already in it.

$ # Define mails. Don't do $mails=something, that will fail.
$ mails='2013-04-16 11:57:14 1US8Fq-0001VC-Uu <= from@domain.com H=reverse.trace.of.ipaddress (server) [xxx.xxx.xxx.xxx]:PORT I=[xxx.xxx.xxx.xxx]:PORT P=esmtp S=5964 id=SOMEIDHERE$@com T="EMAILSUBJECT" from <from@domain.com> for to@domain.com'
$ # Direct the value of $mails to awk's standard input using a here string:
$ awk '{print $5}' <<< "$mails"
from@domain.com
$ # Direct the value of $mails to awk's standard input using echo and a pipe:
$ echo "$mails"| awk '{print $5}'
from@domain.com
$ # Assign the fifth word of "$mails" to the name "myvar" using read;
$ read _ _ _ _ myvar _ <<< "$mails"
$ echo "$myvar"
from@domain.com
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