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I'm a beginner in PHP. In my code, i want the php script to be executed only when the submit button is clicked (set). So when the page is refreshed, the isset() function should return false. Here is the code for test.php

<html>
<head>
<title>A BASIC HTML FORM</title>
<?PHP
if (isset($_POST['Submit1'])) {
    $username = $_POST['username'];

    if ($username == "letmein") {
        print ("Welcome back, friend!");
    }
    else {
        print ("You're not a member of this site");
    }
}

else{
$username = "";
}
?>
</head>
<body>
<Form name ="form1" Method ="POST" Action ="test.php">
    <Input Type = "text" Value ="<?php print $username?>" Name ="username">
    <Input Type = "Submit" Name = "Submit1" Value = "Login">
</form>
</body>
</html>

After clicking the login button the script is executed and the output is "You are not a member", but when i refresh the page,the message from the script still remains on the screen. I believe isset() should return false until i click the button again? What's wrong with the code. Thanks.

share|improve this question
    
isset() is used to check if a variable is defined, not check for a button press. –  Kyle Saltzberg Apr 16 '13 at 23:39
1  
If you refresh a posted form, form data is usually posted again... Press enter in the address field after the current address then the page is reloaded without form data. –  jtheman Apr 16 '13 at 23:40
1  
When you "refresh", you refresh the page INCLUDING the POST data (since that was the last "request" made). You would have to re-enter the address of the page to clear it. Sometimes you see "do you really want to send this form again?" prompt when you refresh - this is why... –  Floris Apr 16 '13 at 23:40
    
isset() think of it like this: Is It Set? you are checking if a variable has been set, I would suggest learning how to successfully use it (your example is correct, don't think otherwise); But not only can be used for validating $_POST and $_GET variables, it can be used to handle some notices that PHP can throw, such as: Undefined Index –  Daryl Gill Apr 16 '13 at 23:55

3 Answers 3

Realized that my comment was really an answer...

When you "refresh", you refresh the page INCLUDING the POST data (since that was the last "request" made). You would have to re-enter the address of the page to clear it. Sometimes you see "do you really want to send this form again?" prompt when you refresh - this is why...

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Okay thanks.. but is re-entering the address the only way to clear it? –  mac007 Apr 17 '13 at 0:22
    
In principle, if you only hit "submit" once, the back button ought to get you back to the original page as well. Try it? If that doesn't work, "back" followed by "reload"? –  Floris Apr 17 '13 at 2:11

Isset() is used to check if a variable example : $variable is actually "set" and is not null. Also when doing a refresh you also refresh the action you have committed and the form data that you have passed. You can think of it as this :

If you go to a shopping website and they tell you to not refresh while your order is processing that means that if you refresh your post data is submitted again meaning you buy 2 microwaves rather then 1 :)

So in coding it will look like this :

if (isset('$_POST['username']')) {
    $username = $_POST['username'];

    if($username == 'letmein') {
         echo ("welcome back, friend!");
    }
}

Hopefully this helps a bit. Good luck! Also if your ever on the "John" and need reading material take a look at the php manual page!

share|improve this answer

Refreshing the page will post the already posted form variables again so every time you refresh your page you are re submitting your form and by this you will have always the isset condition to true :)

I f you need more explaining tell me :)

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