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I'm about to lose my freaking mind. I've been trying to get GzipStream to compress a string for the past hour, but for whatever reason, it refuses to write the entire byte array to the memory stream. At first I thought it had something to do with the using statements, but even after removing them it didn't seem to make a difference.

Initial config:

var str = "Here is a relatively simple string to compress";
byte[] compressedBytes;
string returnedData;

var bytes = Encoding.UTF8.GetBytes(str);

Works correctly (writes 64 length byte array):

using (var msi = new MemoryStream(bytes))
using (var mso = new MemoryStream()) {
   using (var gs = new GZipStream(mso, CompressionMode.Compress)) {
       msi.CopyTo(gs);
   }

   compressedBytes = mso.ToArray();
}

Fails (writes 10 length byte array):

using(var mso = new MemoryStream())
using(var msi = new MemoryStream(bytes))
using(var zip = new GZipStream(mso, CompressionMode.Compress))
{
    msi.CopyTo(zip);
    compressedBytes = mso.ToArray();
}

Also fails (writes 10 length byte array):

var mso = new MemoryStream();
var msi = new MemoryStream(bytes);
var zip = new GZipStream(mso, CompressionMode.Compress);

msi.CopyTo(zip);
compressedBytes = mso.ToArray();

Can somebody explain why the first one works but in the other two I'm getting these incomplete arrays? Is something getting disposed out from under me? For that matter, is there a way for me to avoid using two memorystreams?

Thanks, Zoombini

share|improve this question
    
Use StreamWriter instead of MemoryStream + Encoding.GetBytes. – Hans Passant Apr 18 '13 at 13:32
up vote 0 down vote accepted

As others have said, you need to close the GZipStream before you can get the full data. A using statement will cause the Dispose method to be called on the stream at the end of the block, which will close the stream if it is not already closed. All of your examples above will work as expected if you place zip.Close(); after msi.CopyTo(zip);.

You can eliminate one of the MemoryStreams if you write it this way:

using (MemoryStream mso = new MemoryStream())
{
    using (GZipStream zip = new GZipStream(mso, CompressionMode.Compress))
    {
        zip.Write(bytes, 0, bytes.Length);
    }
    compressedBytes = mso.ToArray();
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks Brian for the extra tip on how to remove one of the MemoryStreams. – zoombini Apr 22 '13 at 15:20
    
Glad I could help. – Brian Rogers Apr 22 '13 at 20:52

You're trying to get the the compressed data before GZipStream is closed. This doesn't return the full data, as you've seen. The reason the first one works is because you're calling compressedBytes = mso.ToArray(); after GZipStream has been disposed. So, untested but in theory, you should be able to modify your second code slightly like this to get it to work.

using(var mso = new MemoryStream())
{
   using(var msi = new MemoryStream(bytes))
   using(var zip = new GZipStream(mso, CompressionMode.Compress))
   {
       msi.CopyTo(zip);
   }
   compressedBytes = mso.ToArray();
}
share|improve this answer

System.IO.Compression.GZipStream has to be closed (disposed) before you can use the underlying stream, because

  1. It works block oriented
  2. It has to write the footer, including the checksum (see the file format description on Wikipedia)
share|improve this answer
    
This makes sense to me, since GZipStream can't really know when I'm finished with it unless I explicitly dispose/close it. Otherwise, maybe I will do some additional writes into the Zip stream. Thanks! – zoombini Apr 22 '13 at 15:23

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