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I have a users document and a user can add their own fields into this document. The fields are unnamed by default (because the user creates them by only clicking a button) but can be renamed by the user after creation through a separate operation.

If I wanted to find the nearest unnamed key under owned: (in this case it would be unnamed-4) and insert that that into the document how would I do that?

Or is there a better data model / method I should be using for this?

Users.update( id, {
    $set: {
        profile: {
            userfields: {
                owned: {
                  unnamed-1 : "field1",
                  unnamed-2 : "field1",
                  unnamed-3 : "field3",
                  mynamedfield : field 4
            }
        }
    }
});
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1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Just use array instead of a map for owned, and use $push command when updating, in case you need to add another one.

Users.update( id, {
$set: {
    profile: {
        userfields: {
            owned: {
              unnamed: [
                "field1",
                "field1",
                "field3" ], 
              named: "field 4"
        }
    }
}

});

 db.Users.update(
                { id: id },
                { $push: { 'profiles.userfields.owned.unnamed': 'field4' } }
              )
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You'd still need to scan the full array to find out that field4 was available though, wouldn't you? –  WiredPrairie Apr 17 '13 at 1:20
    
@WiredPrairie No, in this case there is just no need to scan anything, it would be unnamed[4] instead of unnamed4. –  vittore Apr 17 '13 at 1:53
    
But when one of the indicies is removed, it would repeat? I was assuming the unnamed keys had values, as shown in the data. –  WiredPrairie Apr 17 '13 at 2:49
    
I don't know, topic starter was not specific on that. –  vittore Apr 17 '13 at 3:21
    
The unnamed keys would have values. A prefect analogy is creating a new folder in windows. The first created folder is "New Folder" the second would be "New Folder (2)" and so on. Now if you delete or rename "New Folder (2)" and then make another it would be named "New Folder (2)" and not "New Folder (3)" - the field values is analogous to what's in the folder, regardless of the name changing I want whats in the folder to stay the same. –  funkyeah Apr 17 '13 at 4:06

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