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i have a text file and in some lines the first space from left is 2 space long and i want it to be 1 space long. whats the script for this in bash?

123  2  5//problem
1 2  5
1 2  5
1  32  5//problem

what i want

123 2  5
1 2  5
1 2  5
1 32  5
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3 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Using sed:

sed 's/^\([^ ][^ ]*[ ]\)[ ]*/\1/' input

Starting from the left

^ 

match and capture non-space characters and a space

\([^ ][^ ]*[ ]\)

and any number of additional spaces:

[ ]*   # remove the star if you only care about exactly 2 spaces 

and replace these with the captured part:

 \1
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will the first one look for the first space with length 2 or just look at the first space from left and change it if its length is 2? –  user2020933 Apr 17 '13 at 0:55
    
Note to OS X users (at least as of 10.8): As a simpler alternative, you can use the following: sed -E 's/^([^ ]+ )[ ]+/\1/' input. Note the -E to turn on extended regexes, which (a) adds support for the + quantifier (among other features) and (b) removes the need for escaping the parentheses. (Using + as the quantifier for the final space has the added advantage that only multi-space sequences trigger a match, whereas the original is also triggered by a single space, too (in which case the replacement performed is essentially a no-op).) –  mklement0 Apr 17 '13 at 4:32
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tr way:

cat test.txt | tr -s ' '
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Just to clarify: this will fold all spans of two or more spaces into a single space each. –  mklement0 Apr 17 '13 at 1:15
1  
@mklement: Right, this doesn't solve the problem that was asked. –  jxh Apr 17 '13 at 1:23
1  
Yes, I see now. I didn't realize we still need to keep two spaces between #2 and #3 columns. If this is the case, I'd go with cat-while approach from another answer. –  hudolejev Apr 17 '13 at 2:49
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Edit: I realized that David's answer was almost right.

You can use sed.

cat x | sed -e 's/ \+/ /'

This replaces the first occurrence of one or more spaces with a single space.

But you can do it purely in bash as well:

cat x | while read a b ; do echo "$a" "$b" ; done

This splits each line at the first word, and echos back the first word and the rest of the line. The result is that there is only one space between the first word and the rest of the line.

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Note to OS X users (at least as of 10.8): Use the following sed command instead (note: had to use º in lieu of spaces, because - ironically - SO apparently folds multiple spaces into one in comments): cat x | sed -E 's/^([0-9]+)ºº/\1º/'. Note the -E to turn on extended regexes, which (a) adds support for the + quantifier (among other features) and (b) removes the need for escaping the parentheses and +. –  mklement0 Apr 17 '13 at 4:24
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