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(define key
  (lambda (w)
    (reverse w)
    (if (null? w)
     0
    (let ((k 33))
         (+ (* (ctv(car w)) k) (key (cdr w)))
))))

outputs the same thing as this:

(define key
  (lambda (w)
    (if (null? w)
     0
    (let ((k 33))
         (+ (* (ctv(car w)) k) (key (cdr w)))
))))

Why isn't my word reversed and then computed?

Input: (key '(x y z))

Output: 2475 (for both methods)

I don't understand why this happens. Someone please help me see why this is occurring.

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3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

As has been pointed, the reverse procedure returns a new list, it doesn't modify in-place the list that was passed as a parameter (this happens with all the procedures that modify lists, be careful with it). That's the reason why the line (reverse w) in your code doesn't have any effect: surely it returns a new reversed list, but you ignored the value that was returned!

For using the reversed list, you have to store or pass it along somewhere, a good idea would be to save it in a local variable defined inside a let form and refer to the variable from that point on. This is what @michaelb958 is suggesting:

(define key
  (lambda (w)
    (let ((w (reverse w)))
      (if (null? w)
          0
          (let ((k 33))
            (+ (* (ctv (car w)) k) (key (cdr w))))))))

However, be warned that the above will reverse the w list each time the recursion is called as it traverses the list, I don't think that's what you intend! if you need to reverse the list only once, call reverse before calling key, and don't ever call reverse inside key:

(key (reverse '(x y z)))
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How would you do this? Where can I call reverse so I only call it once in my case? –  Sol Bethany Reaves Apr 17 '13 at 2:39
    
OH! In my main method perhaps! –  Sol Bethany Reaves Apr 17 '13 at 2:40
1  
@SolBethanyReaves that's right, that's the best place to do it. Definitely not in key, otherwise you'd be reversing, re-reversing, re-re-reversing the list each time the recursion gets called ... you get the idea ;) –  Óscar López Apr 17 '13 at 2:46
    
Thank you so much!! I was pondering how to do this for hours. XD –  Sol Bethany Reaves Apr 17 '13 at 2:50
    
As always, my pleasure :) –  Óscar López Apr 17 '13 at 2:51

reverse just returns the reversed list, rather than reversing it in place. You'll need to

(let ((w (reverse w)))
  ...)

to get the effect you want.

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Hmmm, would there be any reason why, that also doesn't work? –  Sol Bethany Reaves Apr 17 '13 at 1:29
    
How exactly doesn't it work? –  michaelb958 Apr 17 '13 at 1:31
    
It outputs the same thing. :( –  Sol Bethany Reaves Apr 17 '13 at 1:32
1  
Suggestion: Your code is now (define key (lambda (w) (reverse w) your-other-code)). Change it to (define key (lambda (w) (let ((w (reverse w))) your-other-code))). –  michaelb958 Apr 17 '13 at 1:34
    
It does something funny: It "reverses" the list '(x y z) to '(y x z) –  Sol Bethany Reaves Apr 17 '13 at 2:36

Since, as others have noted, reverse does not reverse in place, your code should be modified as:

(define key
  (lambda (w)
    (set! w (reverse w))                ; CHANGE IS HERE
    (if (null? w)
         0
         (let ((k 33))
           (+ (* (ctv (car w)) k)
              (key (cdr w)))))))

Note, you are recursively calling key and thus you will be reversing back and forth, again and again.

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