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How can I plot in 3D in python?

I am trying to plot orbital trajectories. Plotting Orbital Trajectories

From the link above, I was able to get help with setting up the function. However I don't know how to plot in 3D.

When this is run, it doesn't generate the correct trajectory.

Switching np.linspace to np.arnage cause a memory error and I am running this on a 64bit system running Xubuntu with 16 GB of Ram.

So I tried converting Distance Units and Time Units but something isn't correct. Maybe my math or something else.

I let 149.6 * 10 ** 6 = 1 DU. A TU is defined as mu = DU ** 3 / TU ** 2 so 1TU = 2241.15 and DU/TU = 66751.4 Using these conversion, I have: I also tried using x2,y2,z2 to see if that would work.

import numpy as np
from scipy.integrate import odeint
import matplotlib.pyplot as plt
from numpy import linspace
from mpl_toolkits.mplot3d import Axes3D

mu = 1
# r0 = [-149.6 * 10 ** 6, 0.0, 0.0]  #  Initial position
# v0 = [29.9652, -5.04769, 0.0]      #  Initial velocity
u0 = [-1, 0.0, 0.0, 0.000448907, -0.0000756192, 0.0]


def deriv(u, dt):
    n = -mu / np.sqrt(u[0] ** 2 + u[1] ** 2 + u[2] ** 2)
    return [u[3],     #  dotu[0] = u[3]'
            u[4],     #  dotu[1] = u[4]'
            u[5],     #  dotu[2] = u[5]'
            u[0] * n,       #  dotu[3] = u[0] * n
            u[1] * n,       #  dotu[4] = u[1] * n
            u[2] * n]       #  dotu[5] = u[2] * n

dt = np.arange(0.0, 20, .0001)   #  Time to run code in seconds'
u = odeint(deriv, u0, dt)
x, y, z, x2, y2, z2 = u.T

fig = plt.figure()
ax = fig.add_subplot(111, projection='3d')
ax.plot(x2, y2, z2)
plt.show()

but this plot isn't correct either. It should be an ellipse that stays on the same trajectory.

enter image description here

#!/usr/bin/env python
#  This program solves the 3 Body Problem numerically and plots the
#  trajectories

import numpy as np
from scipy.integrate import odeint
import matplotlib.pyplot as plt
from numpy import linspace
from mpl_toolkits.mplot3d import Axes3D

mu = 132712000000.0
# r0 = [-149.6 * 10 ** 6, 0.0, 0.0]  #  Initial position
# v0 = [29.9652, -5.04769, 0.0]      #  Initial velocity
u0 = [-149.6 * 10 ** 6, 0.0, 0.0, 29.9652, -5.04769, 0.0]


def deriv(u, dt):
    n = -mu / np.sqrt(u[0] ** 2 + u[1] ** 2 + u[2] ** 2)
    return [u[3],     #  dotu[0] = u[3]'
            u[4],     #  dotu[1] = u[4]'
            u[5],     #  dotu[2] = u[5]'
            u[0] * n,       #  dotu[3] = u[0] * n
            u[1] * n,       #  dotu[4] = u[1] * n
            u[2] * n]       #  dotu[5] = u[2] * n

dt = np.linspace(0.0, 86400 * 700, 5000)  #  Time to run code in seconds'
u = odeint(deriv, u0, dt)
x, y, z, x2, y2, z2 = u.T

fig = plt.figure()
ax = fig.add_subplot(111, projection='3d')
ax.plot(x, y, z)
plt.show()

enter image description here

share|improve this question
    
What exactly is the problem? matplotlib.org/mpl_toolkits/mplot3d/tutorial.html –  sashkello Apr 17 '13 at 1:57
1  
@sashkello I have only been using Python for a week so I am not familiar with how to do this. –  dustin Apr 17 '13 at 2:10
    
I gave you the link which explicitly explains how to do it. Try it yourself before asking, mate :) –  sashkello Apr 17 '13 at 2:11
    
@sashkello well your link doesn't help with a solution set of 6 first order differential equations. –  dustin Apr 17 '13 at 2:14
1  
Your question is not about differential equations, but about plotting. You have (parametric?) function and you need to plot it, that's it. Reformulate the question so that it is clear why standard plotting tools won't work, otherwise it seems like you are asking to do your job... –  sashkello Apr 17 '13 at 2:18

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You can literally take the first several lines from that page that @sashkello, and plug in the x,y, and z that you got from the ode solver.

Copied from http://matplotlib.org/mpl_toolkits/mplot3d/tutorial.html :

import matplotlib.pyplot as plt
from mpl_toolkits.mplot3d import Axes3D

#<<solve for x, y, z here>>#

fig = plt.figure()
ax = fig.add_subplot(111, projection='3d')
ax.plot(x, y, z)
plt.show()
share|improve this answer
    
I kept receiving Excess work done on this call (perhaps wrong Dfun type). Run with full_output = 1 to get quantitative information. Traceback (most recent call last): File "/home/dustin/Documents/School/UVM/Engineering/OrbitalMechanics/hw8problem4.py", line 31, in <module> ax = fig.add_subplot(111, projection='3d') AttributeError: 'function' object has no attribute 'add_subplot' –  dustin Apr 17 '13 at 2:35
1  
"hw8problem4" - so you expect someone to do your homework? –  sashkello Apr 17 '13 at 4:49
2  
@sashkello I can plot this all day in Mathematica. I am working on learning Python. Find my other post and you will see that I can achieve what I need view other means. I also can plot this in Matlab. So don't jump to conclusion because I am trying plot something which I can do in another program. –  dustin Apr 17 '13 at 14:06
1  
@dustin, The problem is not with the plotting here but rather the solutions to your ode from your other question. Take a look at the x, y, and z output from the code there: It's mostly zeros, which is what the plot shows. My guess is something is wrong with the initial conditions, or my implementation of the odeint solver from my other answer, but the plots are fine given your input. –  askewchan Apr 17 '13 at 15:16

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