Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.
template<typename NODETYPE>
const List<NODETYPE> &List<NODETYPE>::operator =(const List<NODETYPE> &right)
{
    if(&right !=this)
    //ListNode is another class I friended with my list class
    {

        ListNode<NODETYPE> *tempPtr = firstPtr;
        ListNode<NODETYPE> *rightPtr = right.firstPtr;

        if(firstPtr==lastPtr)
        {
            firstPtr = lastPtr = 0;
            delete tempPtr;

            while(rightPtr!=NULL)
            {
                insertAtBack(rightPtr->data);
                rightPtr=rightPtr->nextPtr;
            }
        }
        else
        {
            while(tempPtr!=NULL)
            {
                firstPtr = firstPtr->nextPtr;
                delete tempPtr;
                tempPtr = firstPtr;
            }
            while(rightPtr!=NULL)
            {
                insertAtBack(rightPtr->data);
                rightPtr=rightPtr->nextPtr;
            }
        }
    }
    return *this;
}
template<typename NODETYPE>
List<NODETYPE>& List<NODETYPE>::concatenate(const List<NODETYPE>&right)const
{
    ListNode<NODETYPE>*tempPtr = firstPtr;

I used the new operator here so the destructor for the object wouldnt get called when I returned it. I want to create an entirely new List object composed of both lists and return it to the main function while avoiding any memory leaks.

    List<NODETYPE>*newList = new List;


    while(tempPtr != NULL)
    {
        newList->insertAtBack(tempPtr->data);
        tempPtr = tempPtr->nextPtr;
    }
    tempPtr = right.firstPtr;

    while(tempPtr != NULL)
    {
        newList->insertAtBack(tempPtr->data);
        tempPtr = tempPtr->nextPtr;
    }
    return *newList;
}

How do I return a newlist object without creating memory leaks?

template< typename NODETYPE >

void List< NODETYPE >::insertAtBack( const NODETYPE &value )
{
   ListNode< NODETYPE > *newPtr = getNewNode( value ); // new node

   if ( isEmpty() ) // List is empty
      firstPtr = lastPtr = newPtr; // new list has only one node
   else // List is not empty
   {
      lastPtr->nextPtr = newPtr; // update previous last node
      lastPtr = newPtr; // new last node
   } // end else
} // end function insertAtBack

template< typename NODETYPE >
void List< NODETYPE >::insertAtPos( const NODETYPE & value, int pos)
{
    if (pos == 0)
        insertAtFront(value);
    else if (pos < 0)
        cerr << "Trying to insert at invalid list position: " << pos << endl;
    else {
        ListNode< NODETYPE > * ptr = firstPtr;
        for (int i=0; i<pos-1 && ptr != NULL; i++)
            ptr = ptr->nextPtr;
        if (ptr != NULL) {
            ListNode< NODETYPE > *newPtr = getNewNode( value ); // new node
            newPtr->nextPtr = ptr->nextPtr;
            ptr->nextPtr = newPtr;
        }
        else {
            cerr << "Trying to insert at invalid list position." << endl;
        }
    }
}
share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You have the memory leak problem if someone forgets to delete the object returned from concatenate. If you take a reference to a list as a parameter you can let them allocate the list, and it will leave scope appropriately in their code.

Essentially don't allocate memory in the function, require it to be passed into the function.

List<NODETYPE>& List<NODETYPE>::concatenate(const List<NODETYPE> &right, List &newList) const

You can still return the reference to newList at the end so the functions can be chained.

share|improve this answer
    
Yeah that definitely makes sense.My teacher wants us to create a function that takes one List object parameter, this function then appends the List object parameter to the *this List and stores it in a newly created list. Your way makes more sense to me though. I just dont want to use the main to deallocate memory –  AlexGimson Apr 17 '13 at 3:42
    
You don't have to use the new keyword in your main function. You can just define List newList; and then use &newList to pass to the function. Once the variable leaves scope the destructor will be called. You shouldn't allocate memory in the function regardless, in the event that the user of your library wants to allocate memory in a special way (i.e. a memory manager). –  Camron Apr 17 '13 at 3:45

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.