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I have about thirty folders and in each folder there is a number of files that each contain a matrix of different information. I need to be able to import those files so I can do an image plot of the matrices. I know how to do the image plot, but I don't know how to get all the files. Is there a way to loop through each folder and grab the individual files i need from each one? This is yearly meteorological data. So what I have are yearly folders and each folder contains the same variables. I need a loop that can pull the temperature file from the 2005 folder then pull the temperature file from the 2006 folder and so on. Can this be done with a for loop or apply?

share|improve this question
    
Can you show the format of the names of the folders and of the files in them? (Are they something like temp2005, temp2006, or whatever?) – David Robinson Apr 17 '13 at 3:53
    
The folders 2005152, 2005182, 2005312, 2006152, 2006182 and so on. They are folders that represent three months of the year. The files in need in each folder is titled Cirrus_Reflective-_Mean_Daily.mat I know how to import .mat files – user2113499 Apr 17 '13 at 16:01
up vote 2 down vote accepted

Look at ?list.dirs and the related function list.files (both are documented in the same help page.)

First list the directories, e.g.:

> (dirs <- list.dirs("~/foo", recursive = FALSE))
[1] "/home/gavin/foo/bar1" "/home/gavin/foo/bar2"

Then loop over these, list the files in the current directory and read into a list, e.g.

loadFiles <- function(dirs) {
  fs <- list.files(dirs, full.names = TRUE, no.. = TRUE)
  lapply(fs, read.table, ....)
}
fs <- lapply(dirs, loadFiles)

Substitute read.table for whatever function is required to read the files, replace .... with additional arguments to read.table (or the relevant function).

You can then use rapply to loop over fs to do the plotting.

Note none of the above is tested as there was no reproducible example I could quickly throw into a few files and folders to test it.

Here is an example with this kind of setup

> list.dirs("~/foo", recursive = FALSE)
[1] "/home/gavin/foo/bar1" "/home/gavin/foo/bar2"
> list.files("~/foo/bar1")
[1] "file1.csv" "file2.csv" "file3.csv"
> list.files("~/foo/bar2")
[1] "file1.csv" "file2.csv" "file3.csv"

loadFiles <- function(dirs) {
  fs <- list.files(dirs, full.names = TRUE, no.. = TRUE)
  lapply(fs, function(x) data.matrix(read.csv(x, row.names = 1)))
}
fs <- lapply(list.dirs("~/foo", recursive = FALSE), loadFiles)

fs now looks like this:

> str(fs)
List of 2
 $ :List of 3
  ..$ : num [1:5, 1:5] -1.65 -2.47 1.27 0.14 -0.22 ...
  .. ..- attr(*, "dimnames")=List of 2
  .. .. ..$ : chr [1:5] "1" "2" "3" "4" ...
  .. .. ..$ : chr [1:5] "V1" "V2" "V3" "V4" ...
  ..$ : num [1:5, 1:5] 0.417 0.186 -2.452 -0.695 -1.216 ...
  .. ..- attr(*, "dimnames")=List of 2
  .. .. ..$ : chr [1:5] "1" "2" "3" "4" ...
  .. .. ..$ : chr [1:5] "V1" "V2" "V3" "V4" ...
  ..$ : num [1:5, 1:5] 1.41924 -1.96918 0.38819 -0.41437 0.00718 ...
  .. ..- attr(*, "dimnames")=List of 2
  .. .. ..$ : chr [1:5] "1" "2" "3" "4" ...
  .. .. ..$ : chr [1:5] "V1" "V2" "V3" "V4" ...
 $ :List of 3
  ..$ : num [1:5, 1:5] -1.791 0.805 0.302 -0.383 -0.793 ...
  .. ..- attr(*, "dimnames")=List of 2
  .. .. ..$ : chr [1:5] "1" "2" "3" "4" ...
  .. .. ..$ : chr [1:5] "V1" "V2" "V3" "V4" ...
  ..$ : num [1:5, 1:5] 0.305 0.353 -0.342 0.515 -0.375 ...
  .. ..- attr(*, "dimnames")=List of 2
  .. .. ..$ : chr [1:5] "1" "2" "3" "4" ...
  .. .. ..$ : chr [1:5] "V1" "V2" "V3" "V4" ...
  ..$ : num [1:5, 1:5] -0.634 -0.776 0.517 -0.845 0.83 ...
  .. ..- attr(*, "dimnames")=List of 2
  .. .. ..$ : chr [1:5] "1" "2" "3" "4" ...
  .. .. ..$ : chr [1:5] "V1" "V2" "V3" "V4" ...

I haven't quite worked out how to get rapply() to work here, but

lapply(fs, function(x) lapply(x, image))

will plot each of the 3 matrices in each of the two lists.

share|improve this answer
    
If each file is a 10 by 10 matrix how would I put them into an array. Using your example, how would I put each file1.csv into a matrix. This worked great, but it lists out each individual matrix. – user2113499 Apr 23 '13 at 21:43
    
@user2113499 can you start a new question for that please? – Gavin Simpson Apr 23 '13 at 22:11
    
stackoverflow.com/questions/16180583/… This is where the new question is. – user2113499 Apr 23 '13 at 23:01
    
I figured it out! This helped a lot. Thanks. – user2113499 Apr 24 '13 at 19:37

On windows:

Assuming you have yearly folders in D:/data and each folder has file by name temperature.csv

# set the main working directory
setwd("D:/data")

# allocate a list for temperature matrices
list.temp.matrix = vector("list",length(list.dirs(recursive=FALSE)))

# iterate through each folder and load the file
i <- 1
for (dir.name in list.dirs(recursive=FALSE))
{
    file.name <- paste0(dir.name, "/temperature.csv")
    temp.matrix <- as.matrix(read.csv(file.name))

    # update the list
    list.temp.matrix[[i]] <- temp.matrix
    i <- i + 1

    # to avoid over-writing plots
    x11()                                       
    image(temp.matrix)
}
share|improve this answer
    
You can use / instead of `\\` to aid readability. – Matthew Lundberg Apr 17 '13 at 4:15
    
You mean inside setwd()? – Nishanth Apr 17 '13 at 4:16
    
I mean everywhere (for directory paths on Windows). – Matthew Lundberg Apr 17 '13 at 4:16
    
Done. for some reason when I copy from explorer I get this \, so I am used to adding another \ instead of replacing it with / – Nishanth Apr 17 '13 at 4:19
1  
That might eventually bite you. It's a problem when you pass the text to a shell, that shell passes the text to another shell. You end up in escape hell. – Matthew Lundberg Apr 17 '13 at 4:23

If you were looking to have all of the files read as data frames into the current session you could do something like this. I made a temporary directory called temp

> getwd()
[1] "/Users/homedir/tmp"

It has in it 3 directories with data from different years.

> dir()
[1] "data2005" "data2006" "data2007"

In these are saved some files (they're identical for the purpose of the example.

> ddfwind <- data.frame(x=runif(10), y=runif(10))
> ddfsun <- data.frame(x=runif(10), y=runif(10))

Saving these files to the directories to set up the example...

> lapply(dir(), function(x) {
+       save(ddfwind, file=paste(x,"wind.dat",sep="/"))
+       save(ddfsun,file=paste(x,"sun.dat",sep="/"))
+ })

In a new R session, I went to the directory tmp and got all of the files that have wind in their names from all directories

> fn.windData <- dir(pattern="wind.dat$", recursive=TRUE)

Then I used lapply to iterate through these files and load them into the current R session, appending the year of each onto the end of the data frame object.

> lapply(fn.windData, function(x) {
+ L1 <- load(x) 
+ assign(paste0(L1, gsub("[a-z./]", "", x)), get(L1), envir=.GlobalEnv)
+ })
> ls()
[1] "ddfwind2005" "ddfwind2006" "ddfwind2007" "fn.windData"
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