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Here is my code so far. There seems to be soemthing wrong since I keep getting an incorrect answer. I am writing in a text file that is formatted: 2 3.0 1.0

2 being the size of the array and then 3.0 and 1.0 being the coefficients. Hopefully I didnt miss much in my explanation. Any help would be greatly appreciated. Thanks

double polyeval(double* polyarray, double x, int arraySize)
{
    //int result = 0;

    if(arraySize == 0)
    {
        return polyarray[arraySize];
    }

    //result += x*(polyarray[arraySize]+polyeval(polyarray,x,arraySize-1));
      return polyarray[arraySize-1]+ (x* (polyeval(polyarray,x,arraySize-1)));
       //return result;
}

int main ()
{
    int arraySize;
    double x;
    double *polyarray;

    ifstream input;
    input.open("polynomial.txt");
    input >> arraySize;
    polyarray = new double [arraySize];
    for (int a = arraySize - 1; a >= 0; a--)
    {
        input >> polyarray[a];
    }

    cout << "For what value x would you like to evaluate?" << endl;
    cin >> x;
    cout << "Polynomial Evaluation: " << polyeval(polyarray, x, arraySize);

    delete [] polyarray;
}

the idea that if i read in a text file of that format varying in size that it will solve for any value x given by the user

share|improve this question
    
One additional bug. polyeval should return a double, rather than an int. – Michael Anderson Apr 17 '13 at 4:41
    
thank...would it make sense then also declare double polyeval() as the function not int polyeval()? – WRSinclaire Apr 17 '13 at 4:45
    
Yep, thats exactly what I mean, both result and the return type should be double. (Though you dont really use result and it could be removed) – Michael Anderson Apr 17 '13 at 4:45
    
ya I removed result as tacp prompted me to do below – WRSinclaire Apr 17 '13 at 4:48

Jut taking a wild guess

for (int a = arraySize - 1; a >= 0; a--)
//                            ^^
{
    input >> polyarray[a];
}
share|improve this answer

One error is here:

for (int a = arraySize - 1; a > 0; a--)
{                             //^^should be a >=0 
    input >> polyarray[a];
}

You are missing some entry this way.

The recursive function should look like the following:

int polyeval(double* polyarray, double x, int arraySize)
{
   if(arraySize == 1)
   {
      return polyarray[arraySize-1];
   }

   return x*(polyarray[arraySize-1]+polyeval(polyarray,x,arraySize-1));
}
share|improve this answer
    
When I made the suggested corrections my code returns 2304 when x = 24 when it should return 27 given arraySize 2 and array[o] = 3.0 and array[1] = 1.0 (the file that is being read in) – WRSinclaire Apr 17 '13 at 4:24
    
I believe i am storing from lower order to higher order which I guess does mean it is being stored in reverse order since wouldnt that place 1.0 as polyarray[0] and 3.0 as polyarray[1] instead of vice versa? – WRSinclaire Apr 17 '13 at 4:28
    
@user2289029 I think the problem because you are accessing something outside the array since array index starts from 0. so polyarray[arraysize] will be out of bound. Try my updated post? – taocp Apr 17 '13 at 4:29
    
closer this time it returned 96 as my solution. I think that my logic for horners rule is correct is there a way that it is an error in my eclipse compiler? – WRSinclaire Apr 17 '13 at 4:35
    
return polyarray[arraySize-1]+ (x* (polyeval(polyarray,x,arraySize-1))); //this change seemed to work for me apparently my logic was off – WRSinclaire Apr 17 '13 at 4:53

The problem is mainly with the definition of the polynomial coefficients. Your code assumes a polynomial on the form:

x( p(n) + x( p(n-1) + x( p(n-2) + ... x(p(1) + p(0)))..))

This line:

result += x*(polyarray[arraySize]+polyeval(polyarray,x,arraySize-1));

Should become:

result += pow(x,arraySize)*polyarray[arraySize]+polyeval(polyarray,x,arraySize-1);

This way the polynomial is defined correctly as p(n)x^n + p(n-1)x^(n-1) ... + p1 x + p0

share|improve this answer
    
when I do that all that happens is that the result becomes 0. – WRSinclaire Apr 17 '13 at 4:41
    
Please try my corrected suggestion and let me know what you get. – Bichoy Apr 17 '13 at 4:52
    
return polyarray[arraySize-1]+ (x* (polyeval(polyarray,x,arraySize-1))); //changing my code to this seemed to work for me I think this is what you were describing I don't quite know what pow(x,arraySize) is doing in your code? – WRSinclaire Apr 17 '13 at 4:58
    
I also updated my initial code to reflect my changes – WRSinclaire Apr 17 '13 at 4:59
    
I got it now. I was evaluating the polynominal as sum(ai * x^i) not by Horner rule as you wish to do. However, the problem with your original code was that you sum a[0] and a[1] before the first x multiplication. Your correction seem to be the right thing. Congratulations :) – Bichoy Apr 17 '13 at 5:01

Couldn't work out exactly what you were trying to do, or why you were using recursion. So I whipped up a non-recursive version that seems to give the right results.

#include <iostream>
using namespace std;

double polyeval(const double* polyarray, double x, int arraySize) {
    if(arraySize <= 0) { return 0; }
    double value = 0;
    const double * p = polyarray + (arraySize-1);
    for(int i=0; i<arraySize; ++i) {
        value *= x;
        value += *p;
        p--;
    }
    return value;
}

int main () {

    const int arraySize = 3;

    const double polyarrayA[3] = {0.0,0.0,1.0}; // 0 + 0 x + 1 x^2 
    const double polyarrayB[3] = {0.0,1.0,0.0}; // 0 + 1 x + 0 x^2 
    const double polyarrayC[3] = {1.0,0.0,0.0}; // 1 + 0 x + 0 x^2

    cout << "Polynomial Evaluation A f(x) = " << polyeval(polyarrayA, 0.5, arraySize)<<std::endl;
    cout << "Polynomial Evaluation B f(x) = " << polyeval(polyarrayB, 0.5, arraySize)<<std::endl;    
    cout << "Polynomial Evaluation C f(x) = " << polyeval(polyarrayC, 0.5, arraySize)<<std::endl;    


}

You can see it running here:

http://ideone.com/HE4r6x

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