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How to change column order in a table using sql query in sql server 2005?

I want to rearrange column order in a table using sql query.

Please help.

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1  
If you're referring to changing the position of the columns as they exist in the table, you'll need to create a new table with the preferred order, insert the data from the old table, then drop the original table. There's no other way (to my knowledge) to do that. –  Michael Todd Oct 22 '09 at 5:24
    
Are you talking about the column order on a SELECT statement, or the column order on the table definition? –  marc_s Oct 22 '09 at 5:24

7 Answers 7

up vote 22 down vote accepted

You cannot. The column order is just a "cosmetic" thing we humans care about - to SQL Server, it's almost always absolutely irrelevant.

What SQL Server Management Studio does in the background when you change column order there is recreating the table from scratch with a new CREATE TABLE command, copying over the data from the old table, and then dropping it.

There is no SQL command to define the column ordering.

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MySQL lets you "re-order" the default order using 'alter table'. I would assume MS SQL Server can do that too. (Besides, I think he's just after a query, not storage) –  lexu Oct 22 '09 at 5:26
2  
No, there's no such thing ni SQL Server - and should not be in any real RBDMS - column order is not a concept that's relevant to a SQL table –  marc_s Oct 22 '09 at 5:27
9  
@marc_s There isn't a good reason against supporting column order. Even if it's only visual. It simply can make it easier to look at the data in a table with a given column order when you make a "SELECT *". I'm a developer and do this kind of queries all the time. You can spare some time with a good pre-defined column order. From any other standpoint, of course, it has no sense: nothing should depend on the column order. By the way, there is an ORDINAL_POSITION column qhen you query "INFORMATION_SCHEMA.COLUMNS". I don't know what it means... but it must have something to do with this. –  JotaBe Jun 21 '13 at 12:46
    
@marc_s you can tell that's not right by a simple test: if you run the same select * statement twice in SQL Server, does it return the columns in the same order? :) –  Robert Grant Apr 8 '14 at 14:48
1  
Column order is relevant for example when using INSERT INTO without specifying column names. Another example is ORDER BY column index instead of column name. Both obviously not recommended practices, but SQL Server allows it so someone may have used it somewhere, possibly breaking T-SQL code when changing column order. –  Carvelis Jul 7 '14 at 13:38

You have to explicitly list the fields in the order you want them to be returned instead of using * for the 'default' order.

original query:

select * from foobar

returns

foo bar
--- ---
  1   2

now write

select bar, foo from foobar

bar foo
--- ---
  2   1
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This is similar to the question on ordering the records in the result of a query .. and typically no one likes the formally correct answer ;-)

So here it goes:

  • as per SQL standard, the columns in a table are not "ordered"
  • as a result, a select * does not force the columns to be returned in a particular order
  • typically, each RDBMS has a kind of "default" order (usually the order that the columns were added to the table, either in the create table' or in the alter table add ` statements
  • therefore, if you rely on the order of columns (because you are using the results of a query to poulate some other datastructure from the position of the columns), explicitly list the columns in the order you want them.
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You can of course change the order of the columns in a sql statement. However if you want to abstract tables' physical column order, you can create a view. i.e

CREATE TABLE myTable(
    a int NULL,
    b varchar(50) NULL,
    c datetime NULL
);


CREATE VIEW vw_myTable
AS
SELECT c, a, b
  FROM myTable;

select * from myTable;
a  b  c
-  -  -

select * from vw_myTable
c  a  b
-  -  -
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As per http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/aa337556.aspx

This task cannot be performed using Transact-SQL statements.

But it is possible using SQL Server Management Studio

  1. In Object Explorer, right-click the table with columns you want to reorder and click Design (Modify in ver. 2005 SP1 or earlier)
  2. Select the box to the left of the column name that you want to reorder. (You can select multiple columns by holding the [shift] or the [ctrl] keys on your keyboard.)
  3. Drag the column(s) to another location within the table.

Then click save. This method actually drops and recreates the table, so some errors might occur.

If Change Tracking option is enabled for the database and the table, you shouldn't use this method.

If it is disabled, the Prevent saving changes that require the table re-creation option should be cleared in Tools menu > Options > Designers, otherwise "Saving changes is not permitted" error will occur.

  • Disabling the Prevent saving changes that require the table re-creation option is strongly advised against by Microsoft, as it leads to the existing change tracking information being deleted when the table is re-created, so you should never disable this option if Change Tracking is enabled!

Problems may also arise during primary and foreign key creation.

If any of the above errors occurs, saving fails which leaves you with the original column order.

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You can do it by creating a new table, copy all the data over, drop the old table, then renaming the new one to replace the old one.

You could also add new columns to the table, copy the column by column data over, drop the old columns, then rename new columns to match the old ones. A simple example below: http://sqlfiddle.com/#!3/67af4/1

CREATE TABLE TestTable (
    Column1 INT,
    Column2 VARCHAR(255)
);
GO

insert into TestTable values(1, 'Test1');
insert into TestTable values(2, 'Test2');
GO

select * from TestTable;
GO

ALTER TABLE TestTable ADD Column2_NEW VARCHAR(255);
ALTER TABLE TestTable ADD Column1_NEW INT;
GO

update TestTable 
set Column1_NEW = Column1, 
    Column2_NEW = Column2;
GO

ALTER TABLE TestTable DROP COLUMN Column1;
ALTER TABLE TestTable DROP COLUMN Column2;
GO

sp_rename 'TestTable.Column1_NEW', 'Column1', 'COLUMN';
GO
sp_rename 'TestTable.Column2_NEW', 'Column2', 'COLUMN';
GO

select * from TestTable;
GO
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Use

SELECT * FROM TABLE1

which displays the default column order of the table.

If you want to change the order of the columns.

Specify the column name to display correspondingly

SELECT COLUMN1, COLUMN5, COLUMN4, COLUMN3, COULMN2 FROM TABLE1
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