Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I need to select matched pairs from two tables containing similarly structured data. "Matched Pair" here means two rows that reference each other in the 'match' column.

A single-table matched pair example:

TABLE
----
id | matchid
1  |   2
2  |   1

ID 1 and 2 are a matched pair because each has a match entry for the other.

Now the real question: what is the best (fastest) way to select the matched pairs that appear in both tables:

Table ONE (id, matchid)
Table TWO (id, matchid)

Example data:

ONE                TWO
----               ----
id  | matchid      id  | matchid
1   |   2          2   |   3
2   |   3          3   |   2
3   |   2
4   |   5
5   |   4

The desired result is a single row with IDs 2 and 3.

RESULT
----
id  | id
2   | 3

This is because 2 & 3 are a matched pair in table ONE and in table TWO. 4 & 5 are a matched pair in table ONE but not TWO, so we don't select them. 1 and 2 are not a match pair at all since 2 does not have a matching entry for 1.

I can get the matched pairs from one table with this:

SELECT a.id, b.id 
    FROM ONE a JOIN ONE b
       ON a.id = b.matchid AND a.matchid = b.id
    WHERE a.id < b.id

How should I build a query that selects only the matching pairs that appear in both tables?

Should I:

  • Select the query above for each table and WHERE EXISTS them together?
  • Select the query above for each table and JOIN them together?
  • Select the query above then JOIN table TWO twice, once for 'id' and once for 'matchid'?
  • Select the query above for each table and loop through to compare them back in php?
  • Somehow filter table TWO down so we only have to look at the IDs in matched pairs in table ONE?
  • Do something totally different?

(Since this is a question of efficiency, it is worth noting that the matches will be quite sparse, maybe 1/1000 or less, and each table will have 100,000+ rows.)

share|improve this question
    
Aren't you just trying to JOIN on a.matchid = b.matchid? –  sashkello Apr 17 '13 at 5:10
    
@sashkello - not quite. There has to be two rows in the table, each matching the other. Then those matches have to exist in both tables. –  hamboy Apr 17 '13 at 5:14
    
I don't get your idea. It seem like a simple question which you over-complicated... –  sashkello Apr 17 '13 at 5:16
    
try my answer below :D –  John Woo Apr 17 '13 at 6:03
1  
Note that the existence of data (like the relation between id and matchid) in multiple tables might be considered a sign of bad database design, since it is redundant and therefore prone to inconsistencies. –  MvG Apr 17 '13 at 7:49
add comment

3 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I think I get your point. You want to filter the records in which the pairs exists on both tables.

SELECT  LEAST(a.ID, a.MatchID) ID, GREATEST(a.ID, a.MatchID) MatchID
FROM    One a
        INNER JOIN Two b
            ON a.ID = b.ID AND
                a.matchID = b.matchID
GROUP   BY LEAST(a.ID, a.MatchID), GREATEST(a.ID, a.MatchID)
HAVING  COUNT(*) > 1
share|improve this answer
add comment

Try this Query:

   select 
    O.id,
    O.matchid
    from 
    ONE O
    where 
    (CAST(O.id as CHAR(50))+'~'+CAST(O.matchid as CHAR(50)))
    in (select CAST(T.id as CHAR(50))+'~'+CAST(T.matchid as CHAR(50)) from TWO T)

Edited Query:

select distinct
Least(O.id,O.matchid) ID,
Greatest(O.id,O.matchid) MatchID
from 
ONE O
where 
(CAST(O.id as CHAR(50))+'~'+CAST(O.matchid as CHAR(50)))
in (select CAST(T.id as CHAR(50))+'~'+CAST(T.matchid as CHAR(50)) from TWO T)
and (CAST(O.matchid as CHAR(50))+'~'+CAST(O.id as CHAR(50)))
in (select CAST(T.id as CHAR(50))+'~'+CAST(T.matchid as CHAR(50)) from TWO T)

SQL Fiddle

share|improve this answer
add comment

Naive version, which checks all the four rows that need to exist:

-- EXPLAIN ANALYZE
WITH both_one AS (
        SELECT o.id, o.matchid
        FROM one o
        WHERE o.id < o.matchid
        AND EXISTS ( SELECT * FROM one x WHERE x.id = o.matchid AND x.matchid = o.id)
        )
, both_two AS (
        SELECT t.id, t.matchid
        FROM two t
        WHERE t.id < t.matchid
        AND EXISTS ( SELECT * FROM two x WHERE x.id = t.matchid AND x.matchid = t.id)
        )
SELECT *
FROM both_one oo
WHERE EXISTS (
        SELECT *
        FROM both_two tt
        WHERE tt.id = oo.id AND tt.matchid = oo.matchid
        );

This one is simpler :

-- EXPLAIN ANALYZE
WITH pair AS (
        SELECT o.id, o.matchid
        FROM one o
        WHERE EXISTS ( SELECT * FROM two x WHERE x.id = o.id AND x.matchid = o.matchid)
        )
SELECT *
FROM pair pp
WHERE EXISTS (
        SELECT *
        FROM pair xx
        WHERE xx.id = pp.matchid AND xx.matchid = pp.id
        )
AND pp.id < pp.matchid
        ;
share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.