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I recently started using the @font-face property in my project and it works wonderfully most of the time. However, I have noticed that some .ttf font files(downloaded from Fontsquirrel.com) look extremely choppy in Firefox but look great in Chrome. I know that .ttf files are supposed to work across both Firefox and Chrome and that seems to be case but the choppiness is pretty annoying. Could anyone provide a solution for this behavior and in general terms, suggest a reliable method for achieving cross-browser fonts?

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do you have the latest firefox version? i dont think there is much to do. other than trying to find a font that works better. –  btevfik Apr 17 '13 at 6:25
    
Yep Firefox 20.0.1. I solved my problem,posting it below. Thank you for your time! –  Ronophobia Apr 17 '13 at 6:51
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up vote 1 down vote accepted

I solved my problem by using the fontsquirrel webfont generator . It's an amazing tool that I recommend to anyone facing cross-browser font issues. Also, a format like this works in most situations:

@font-face {
    font-family: Roboto;
    font-style: normal;
    font-weight: normal;
    src: url('../content/Fonts/roboto-regular-webfont.eot');
    src: url('../content/Fonts/roboto-regular-webfont.eot?#iefix') format('embedded-opentype'),
        url('../content/Fonts/roboto-regular-webfont.woff') format('woff'),
         url('../content/Fonts/roboto-regular-webfont.ttf') format('truetype'),
         url('../content/Fonts/roboto-regular-webfont.svg#roboto-regular-webfont') format('svg');
}  
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when you said fontsquirrel i already assumed you used the webfont generator. so didnt recommend it. i always use it. –  btevfik Apr 17 '13 at 7:14
    
Ah sorry,my mistake. What I was doing until that point was just downloading individual zips of the fonts on site in any one of the formats(usually .ttf or .otf) and then using online tools for converting the files to the other font types. Guess those online tools weren't as good as the webfont generator. –  Ronophobia Apr 17 '13 at 7:32
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