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Let's say I have an interface that many many distinct classes implement:

public interface IHaveObjects
{
    object firstObject();
}

(Note: I can't make it an abstract base class as implementors of IHaveObjects may already have a base class.)

Now I want to add a new method to the interface, so that one implementer of the interface can have special behaviour for it. Ideally I would do something like this:

public interface IHaveObjects
{
    object firstObject();
    object firstObjectOrFallback()
    {
        return firstObject();
    }
}

then go to that one implementor of the interface and give it the override:

public class ObjectHaverPlus : IHaveObjects
{
    public override object IHaveObjects.firstObjectOrFallback()
    {
        return firstObject() ?? getDefault();
    }
}

However it is forbidden in C# to provide a method body in an interface, and I would like to avoid going to every single implementer of IHaveObjects to drop in a definition of firstObjectOrFallback(). (Imagine if there are hundreds or thousands)

Is there a way to do this without lots of copy paste?

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1  
Why not create a second interface for that special case? You can't have multiple inheritance of classes, but you can implement multiple interfaces. –  Tim Apr 17 '13 at 5:40

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

How about introducing a second interface which inherits from IHaveObjects.

Than you only have to change these classes, which need the new interface with the new method.

This looks like:

  interface I1
    {
        void Method1();
    }

    interface I2 : I1
    {
        void Method2();
    }
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Oh...I like that...didn't even think about inheritance in my answer. Silly me :) –  Tim Apr 17 '13 at 5:46
    
Yes, but this is not possible in c#. I gave him an alternative way. –  Tomtom Apr 17 '13 at 6:10
    
@Tomtom I think this is what I want to do. It means doing another check to see if the object is of the extended interface, but that should be fine. Thank you –  Patashu Apr 17 '13 at 6:12
1  
@Tim sure, but it wasn't really what he was asking for ... but it doesn't matter aslong he is fine with this answer –  WiiMaxx Apr 17 '13 at 6:33
1  
@Tomtom if you edit your answer i can undo my -1 –  WiiMaxx Apr 17 '13 at 6:34

That's the problem with interfaces - they don't have any default implementation so any changes to them are breaking changes - i.e. code needs to be modified to work with new version of interface.

Since your implementations already have base classes on their own - you cannot turn it into abstract class, nor does C# have multiple class inheritance.

What you can do is to think - is it really a method on interface? Or could it be implemented as an extension method on interface (didn't try that but I suppose it will work just fine)?

If it is a method on interface and it should stay there - you may think of breaking this interface into two parts, second inheriting from the first (IHaveObjectsAndSupportDefault : IHaveObjects) and use this interface where default value is truly needed (like some other answers indicate).

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I may have misunderstood your question, but why not use a second interface, something like:

public interface IHaveObjectsEnhanced
{

    object FirstObjectOrFallback();
}

Then you could implement the first and second interface:

public class ObjectHaverPlus : IHaveObjects, IHaveObjectsEnhanced
{

    public object FirstObject()
    {

    }

    public object FirstObjectOrFallback()
    {
         return FirstObject() ?? GetDefault();
    }

}
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