Dismiss
Announcing Stack Overflow Documentation

We started with Q&A. Technical documentation is next, and we need your help.

Whether you're a beginner or an experienced developer, you can contribute.

Sign up and start helping → Learn more about Documentation →
1+3+9 = 13 = 1+3 = 4.
6+1+1+5 = 13 = 1+3 = 4.
9+9+4 = 22 = 2+2 = 4.
etc

Considering the previous examples, one could say that the possibilities of reduction to the number 4 goes up to infinity. Nevertheless, IT IS possible to control the number of digits that enters in the initial game of sums.

def reduct(length):
    ...
    ...
    return reduction

Do you guys have any Idea of how I could code a function like this? I want to input a "length", and, supposing it to be 7 for example, and supposing that the ending reduction is 5, I want it to do this:

x+x+x+x+x+x+x = 5.

Where it gives me ALL THE POSSIBILITIES for the x numbers.

I've spent too much time trying to solve the problem and I could not figure out how to do it. It's a very nice programming exercise by the way (A good challenge); I thank you all very much for the help.

share|improve this question
    
what is the limit of the length? You want all the solution or just the count? – marcadian Apr 17 '13 at 6:25
    
The length will be specified by a "raw_input". It could be any number. So, I would like to know how the function would be with any length, just to see how it would work :). – Ericson Willians Apr 17 '13 at 6:31
    
are you saying there is no limit on the length? – marcadian Apr 17 '13 at 6:34
up vote 5 down vote accepted

I managed to conjure up a solution (assuming itertools has already been imported):

def reduct(length, n=5):
    return [i for i in \
            itertools.combinations_with_replacement(range(1, 10), length) \
            if ((sum(i) - 1) % 9 + 1) == n]

This returns all unique combinations that "reduce" to n, which is 5 by default.


Explanation:

  • itertools.combinations_with_replacement(range(1, 10), length) yields all unique combinations of length one digit numbers (excluding 0). See the documentation.
  • ((sum(i) - 1) % 9 + 1) yields the "reduction" of each combination. It uses the digital root formula ((n - 1) % 9 + 1, with n as the sum of the numbers in the combination.
  • The rest is self explanatory (I hope).

Some test runs:

>>> reduct(2)
[(1, 4), (2, 3), (5, 9), (6, 8), (7, 7)]
>>> reduct(3)
[(1, 1, 3), (1, 2, 2), (1, 4, 9), (1, 5, 8), (1, 6, 7), (2, 3, 9),
 (2, 4, 8), (2, 5, 7), (2, 6, 6), (3, 3, 8), (3, 4, 7), (3, 5, 6),
 (4, 4, 6), (4, 5, 5), (5, 9, 9), (6, 8, 9), (7, 7, 9), (7, 8, 8)]
>>> len(reduct(7))
715

Specifying a custom n:

>>> reduct(2, 8)
[(1, 7), (2, 6), (3, 5), (4, 4), (8, 9)]
>>> reduct(3, 8)
[(1, 1, 6), (1, 2, 5), (1, 3, 4), (1, 7, 9), (1, 8, 8), (2, 2, 4),
 (2, 3, 3), (2, 6, 9), (2, 7, 8), (3, 5, 9), (3, 6, 8), (3, 7, 7),
 (4, 4, 9), (4, 5, 8), (4, 6, 7), (5, 5, 7), (5, 6, 6), (8, 9, 9)]
>>> len(reduct(7, 8))
715
share|improve this answer
    
Bloody brilliant! Thank you very much! I'll study it deeply. – Ericson Willians Apr 17 '13 at 6:44
1  
@EricsonWillians no worries. It was an interesting challenge! – Volatility Apr 17 '13 at 6:46
    
Digital root formula.. that's pretty cool – wim Apr 17 '13 at 6:59
    
@wim yeah. I didn't actually know about it until I read it on another SO post (can't find it now, unfortunately). It's pretty nifty. – Volatility Apr 17 '13 at 7:05

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.