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clang and gcc differ in behaviour for the following code:

struct foo
{
    foo(int);
};

struct waldo
{
    template <typename T>
    operator T();
};

int main()
{
    waldo w;
    foo f{w};
}

This code is accepted by clang, with the foo(int) constructor being called. However, gcc complains about an ambiguity between the foo(int) constructor and the implicitly generated copy and move constructors:

test.cpp: In function 'int main()':
test.cpp:15:12: error: call of overloaded 'foo(<brace-enclosed initializer list>)' is ambiguous
     foo f{w};
            ^
test.cpp:15:12: note: candidates are:
test.cpp:3:5: note: foo::foo(int)
     foo(int);
     ^
test.cpp:1:8: note: constexpr foo::foo(const foo&)
 struct foo
        ^
test.cpp:1:8: note: constexpr foo::foo(foo&&)

Who is right?

It's also interesting to note that if foo f{w} is changed to foo f(w) (note the change from braces to parentheses), both gcc and clang give an error. This makes me hope that gcc's behaviour for the above example (i.e. giving an error) is correct, otherwise there would be a strange inconsistency between the () and {} forms of initialization.

EDIT: Following Kerrek SB's suggestion, I tried deleteing the copy constructor of foo:

struct foo
{
    foo(int);
    foo(const foo&) = delete;
};

The behaviour remains the same.

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1  
I'd go with GCC on this one: Both conversions to int and to Foo are possible, so this really looks ambiguous. Try deleting or defaulting the copy/move constructors, though, and compare. –  Kerrek SB Apr 17 '13 at 7:51
4  
@KerrekSB deleted functions do participate in overload resolution. –  TemplateRex Apr 17 '13 at 8:01
    
@rhalbersma: Good point! –  Kerrek SB Apr 17 '13 at 8:19
4  
Apparently (according to slide 17 of this talk) that style of brace-initialisation can't be used for copying in C++11, which would make Clang correct. It's regarded as a defect, probably to be fixed in C++14, making GCC correct. However, I can't seem to find the wording in C++11 that prevents it, so I can't give a definitive answer. –  Mike Seymour Apr 17 '13 at 8:28
1  
@MikeSeymour: litb, of course :p And thanks for Bjarne's talk by the way, I had not seen it! –  Matthieu M. Apr 17 '13 at 9:32

1 Answer 1

up vote 11 down vote accepted

For list initialization, if the element of the list has one element (here, w), and a constructor of a class X with parameter "reference to const/volatile X" is considered, no user defined conversions are considered. So both the copy and move constructor of foo cannot be used. So the foo(int) constructor is unambiguously chosen.

So Clang is correct here.

EDIT: For the Standards folks in here, see 13.3.3.1p4

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1  
for cross-reference: stackoverflow.com/q/12677711/819272 –  TemplateRex Apr 17 '13 at 9:34

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