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I'm looking for the most standards-compliant / future-proof method for front-end HTML templating.

There exists a relatively new W3C draft specification for HTML Templates, e.g.:

<template id="mytemplate">
    <img src="" alt="great image">
    <div class="comment"></div>
</template>

Does anyone know if any good JavaScript polyfills already exist to make <template> element usable in a cross-browser way? Preferably complying with this standard.


Difficulties

According the the HTML5Rocks guide these templates have the following properties:

  • "Its content is effectively inert until activated"
  • "Script doesn't run, images don't load, audio doesn't play,"
  • "Content is considered not to be in the document"
  • "Templates can be placed anywhere inside of <head>, <body>, or <frameset>"

I think it is impossible to implement all four of these properties purely with a JavaScript polyfill, so any solution would only be partial.

share|improve this question
    
stackoverflow.com/about –  Xotic750 May 11 '13 at 9:36

1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

There is a jsfiddle that demonstrates such a polyfill.

<script>
    // Shim so we can style in IE6/7/8
    document.createElement('template');
</script>

<template id="example">
    <h1>
        This is template content.
    </h1>
    <p>
        It's really great.
    </p>
</template>


<div id="target">
    <p>
        This is regular old content.
    </p>
</div>

/* POLYFILL */
(function templatePolyfill(d) {
    if('content' in d.createElement('template')) {
        return false;
    }

    var qPlates = d.getElementsByTagName('template'),
        plateLen = qPlates.length,
        elPlate,
        qContent,
        contentLen,
        docContent;

    for(var x=0; x<plateLen; ++x) {
        elPlate = qPlates[x];
        qContent = elPlate.childNodes;
        contentLen = qContent.length;
        docContent = d.createDocumentFragment();

        while(qContent[0]) {
            docContent.appendChild(qContent[0]);
        }

        elPlate.content = docContent;
    }
})(document);

/* EXAMPLE */
var elExample = document.getElementById('example'),
    elTarget = document.getElementById('target');

elTarget.appendChild(elExample.content.cloneNode(true));

As for libraries, and I don't know that they support it yet, but try something like Modernizr and Initializr

share|improve this answer
    
Do you have a link to the jsfiddle? (although also it it's not advisable to create a link only answer). I am aware of Modernizr (Initializr just seems to include Modernizr for its polyfills) and it doesn't polyfill <template>s. It looks like Modernizr might include detection but that's it. –  Robin Winslow Apr 17 '13 at 9:22
    
The link is in my answer above, click on the text jsfiddle –  Xotic750 Apr 17 '13 at 9:26
    
Your answer doesn't support the important requirement - security. ;) Once you put your template in a <template> element in a browser that doesn't treat it specially, you don't have an inert template. Load jsfiddle.net/h3EmY/80 in IE10-11 and you'll see. –  m_gol May 11 '14 at 22:15
    
You can simulate inertness via using a script tag with a custom mime type but then you don't get .content. –  m_gol May 11 '14 at 22:15
1  
I don't use IE of any version, and while it is useful to point out security, the OP wanted: preferably a standards compliant polyfill but if not available then any solution close to it. A quote from Modernizr "just because you can use a polyfill doesn’t mean you should" –  Xotic750 May 11 '14 at 22:31

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