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I did not realize that this simple looking problem would so difficult to crack.

Anyway, I have an array which contains 3 floating point number. I need to find out the smallest of all three (well smallest of three in this case, my actual code will contain more than 3 floating number)

here is my code:

#!/usr/bin/perl -w
use strict;
use List::Util qw /min/;
my @array = ("2.7.4", "2.7.0", "2.7.0");
print min(@array);

OUTPUT:

Argument "2.7.4" isn't numeric in subroutine entry at min.pl line 6.
Argument "2.7.0" isn't numeric in subroutine entry at min.pl line 6.
Argument "2.7.0" isn't numeric in subroutine entry at min.pl line 6.
2.7.4

So it is throwing a lot of errors as well as the output number is wrong.

Another shot I took was sorting the array (sort {$a <=> $b} @array) and then finding the smallest one But again it fails to do the job.

I can do a number by number comparison but the code would look nasty in case the number of elements in the array are anything more than three.

could you help.

thanks.

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3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You could use version.

#!/usr/bin/perl
use strict;
use warnings;
use version 0.77 (); # disable importing qv

use List::Util qw'min';
my @array = map{
  version->parse($_)
} qw' 2.7.4  2.7.0  2.7.0 ';

print min(@array), "\n";

Or you could convert it to a vstring, and use string comparisons (not recommended).

Either manually

#!/usr/bin/perl
use strict;
use warnings;

sub to_vstring{
  # join '', map chr, split /[.]/, shift
  pack 'U*', split /[.]/, shift;
}

sub from_vstring{
  # join '.', map ord, split //, shift
  join '.', unpack 'U*', shift;
}

use List::Util qw'minstr'; # not min
my @array = map{
  to_vstring($_)
} qw' 2.7.4  2.7.0  2.7.0 ';

print from_vstring( minstr(@array) ), "\n";

or using a string eval

sub to_vstring{
  my $c = shift;
  die "invalid vstring '$c'" unless $c =~ /^v?[0-9]+(?:[.][0-9]+)*$/;
  $c = 'v'.$c unless substr($c,0,1) eq 'v';
  eval $c;
}

sub from_vstring{
  my $c = shift;
  die "not a vstring '$c'" unless ref(\$c) eq 'VSTRING';
  # join '.', map ord, split //, shift
  join '.', unpack 'U*', shift;
}

If you were going to go this route you may want to carry around the original string.

my @array = map{
  [ to_vstring($_), $_ ]
} qw' 2.7.4  2.7.0  2.7.0 ';

my $min_pair = sort {$a->[0] cmp $b->{0]} @array;

my $min = $min_pair->[1];

print $min, "\n"
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for detailed answer. However, I do not understand the map and always try avoiding it. I am referring the 1st solution using version that you have provided. Could you please post the same code without using map. That would be immensely helpful. –  slayedbylucifer Apr 18 '13 at 4:37
1  
my @a = map{ b($_) } @c; => my @a; for( @c ){ push @a, b->($_) } –  Brad Gilbert Apr 21 '13 at 20:01
    
Thanks. Now I get it. –  slayedbylucifer Apr 22 '13 at 2:30

These aren't floating point numbers because they have more than one decimal separator! They look like version numbers. You want Sort::Naturally or version.

share|improve this answer
    
+1. Thanks. yes these are the BIOS version I am working on. –  slayedbylucifer Apr 17 '13 at 9:16
    
I am going with version. Thanks for the pointer. I found a couple solution @ perlmonks.org/?node_id=813943 –  slayedbylucifer Apr 17 '13 at 9:35
2  
I have liked Sort::Versions. The version module is tuned for Perl version numbers, which can be, lets say odd. –  Joel Berger Apr 17 '13 at 21:02

The messages you get are not errors, but warnings. You get those because you enabled them with the -w switch, which i would suggest you replace by the line use warnings;, since there are modules which will generate unintended warnings when you start perl with -w.

The reason, that min is not able to sort your list, is that those are not floating point numbers, that are strings. When comparing the strings in numerical context, perl extracts what it believes to be a number. Which in the case of "2.7.4" is 2.7 and for "2.7.0" is also 2.7.

String comparison (as suggested by other answers) may work if your format does not change. But string comparison sees "12" as smaller than "9" since it compares the characters of the string from left to right and decides which of the strings is greater or smaller by the first pair of different characters.

If those numbers you want to compare are like version numbers, the number "2.10.1" could occur and would by string comparison be considered smaller than "2.7.0". A way around that is to split the string into three separate numbers and compare those individually (how to do that is left as an exercise to the reader).

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+1. thanks for the detailed explanation. –  slayedbylucifer Apr 17 '13 at 9:20

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