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So I'm trying to open and read csv file that has no field names. Based on the research I've done, I'm pretty sure it's encoded in UTF-8. My csv has this formatting:

1,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0, 
2,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0, 

I use the following to open and read it:

def parseCSVCounter(csv_file):

with codecs.open(csv_file, "r", "utf-8-sig","strict", -1) as f:
    f = str(f)
    relayreader = csv.reader(f, delimiter=',')
    for row in relayreader:
        print(row)

        try:
            #row[0] = unicode(row[0], 'latin-1')
            counter(row)
            print('starting row..')

        except UnicodeDecodeError, e:
            print('something went wrong1')
            print e

        except Exception, e:
            print('something went wrong')
            print e

This generates

Starting Command..
['<']
something went wrong
invalid literal for int() with base 10: '<'
['o']
something went wrong
invalid literal for int() with base 10: 'o'
........
starting row..
['9']
starting row..
['3']
starting row..
['8']
starting row..
['2']
starting row..
['8']
starting row..
['>']
something went wrong
invalid literal for int() with base 10: '>'`

I cut this down to prove my point. It seems that it's automatically generating field names for me. With csv.DictReader(fieldnames = 'foo') I am able to specify field names in a sequence. How do I get csv.reader() to ignore the lack of field names?

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>>> x = open('aaa', 'w') >>> str(x) "<open file 'aaa', mode 'w' at 0x01FC9860>" –  jamylak Apr 17 '13 at 9:56

1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You do not need to call str(f); use the file object directly:

with codecs.open(csv_file, "r", "utf-8-sig", "strict") as f:
    relayreader = csv.reader(f, delimiter=',')

You are trying to read the output of str(f) as a CSV file instead, and that's a string of the form:

<open file '/path/to/file', mode 'rb' at 0x105f10d20>

You can see that from your error output; it is spelling out <, o, etc. all the way through to the memory address digits and the closing >.

Note that the utf-8-sig codec can handle a UTF-8-encoded BOM to be present at the start of the file, but unless that BOM is expected to be there, the normal UTF-8 codec will do just fine.

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