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I'm developing a project that has a number of hardware sensors connecting to the deployment machine through RS232 serial ports.

But ... I'm developing on a machine without an physical RS232 serial ports, but I would like to make fake serial ports that I can connect to and output data from with the aim of faking input from hardware sensors.

Does anyone know of a way to create a fake serial port and control it on Windows XP?

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Have you tried virtual machines with serial ports installed? – Restuta Oct 22 '09 at 8:22
I haven't tried that. The sounds like it needs to be a full answer rather than a comment :) – Brian Heylin Oct 22 '09 at 8:25
I was able to use com0com and the Com Port Serial Emulator on Windows 7 64-bit without issue, worked great. – JWiley Oct 6 '14 at 16:53

4 Answers 4

up vote 35 down vote accepted

If you are developing for Windows, the com0com project might be, what you are looking for.

It provides pairs of virtual COM ports that are linked via a nullmodem connetion. You can then use your favorite terminal application or whatever you like to send data to one COM port and recieve from the other one.


As Thomas pointed out the project lacks of a signed driver, which is especially problematic on certain Windows version (e.g. Windows 7 x64).

There are a couple of unofficial com0com versions around that do contain a signed driver. One recent verion ( can be downloaded e.g. from here.

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Although com0com project is an excellent open source project, as it should install device driver without digital signature, some Windows systems checking digitally signed driver will not work with its virtual serial port. Just want people know. – Tae-Sung Shin Oct 31 '12 at 17:55
@Thomas: Searching the net reveals that there are some unofficial signed versions of the driver around. One recent verion ( can be downloaded from here. – Frank Bollack Jul 11 '13 at 15:10
Many Thanks, you deserve a beer! – Pale Ale Oct 16 '13 at 14:13
how is this actually done though? what are the windows basics? – Nacht Feb 15 '14 at 7:52
@Nacht Every driver makes some abstraction even there is real serial port "connectet" to them. This mean that if you write driver you will notice you do not have to comunicate with real thing. Than you can use trasmition buffer as you want. In this virtual case, instead of send stream to real thing you send data to another "port". That port is a pair with the first one. Whole thing looks like mirroring data stream. I hope it is clear now. – MrHIDEn Feb 7 at 22:46

I know this is an old post, but in case someone else happens upon this question, one good option is Virtual Serial Port Emulator (VSPE) from Eterlogic It provides an API for creating kernel mode virtual comport devices, i.e. connectors, mappers, splitters etc.
However, some of the advertised capabilities were really not capabilities at all.

A much better choice, Eltima. This product is fully baked. Good developer tech support. Product does all it claims to do.

Neither of these products are open source, or free. However, as other posts here have pointed out, there are other options. Here is a list of various serial utilities:

com0com (current)
com0com - With Signed Driver (old version)
and, yet another place for com0com with Signed Driver
Tactical Software
COM Port Serial Emulator
Kermit (obsolete, but still downloadable)

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I use com0com - With Signed Driver, on windows 7 x64 to emulate COM3 AND COM4 as a pair.

Then i use COM Dataport Emulator to recieve from COM4.

Then i open COM3 with the app im developping (c#) and send data to COM3.

The data sent thru COM3 is received by COM4 and shown by 'COM Dataport Emulator' who can also send back a response (not automated).

So with this 2 great programs i managed to emulate Serial RS-232 comunication.

Hope it helps.

Both programs are free!!!!!

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Another alternative, even though the OP did not ask for it:

There exist usb-to-serial adapters. Depending on the type of adapter, you may also need a nullmodem cable, too.

They are extremely easy to use under linux, work under windows, too, if you have got working drivers installed.

That way you can work directly with the sensors, and you do not have to try and emulate data. That way you are maybe even save from building an anemic system. (Due to your emulated data inputs not covering all cases, leading you to a brittle system.)

Its often better to work with the real stuff.

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