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Let's take an example,

class base{
public:
virtual void abstract() = 0;
};

class derived:public base{
public:
void abstract(){cout << "Abstract\n";}
};

int main{
derived d;
d.abstract();
return 0;
}

It can be written in other way as,

class base{
    public:
    void abstract(){cout << "Abstract\n";}
    };

    int main{
    base b;
    b.abstract();
    return 0;
    }

It is also providing same result, infact here I don't need to derive the class. I did read many article on abstract class, it says we can not instantiate base class and a pure virtual function forces user to define the function. But if we will see the above code in both the cases I am getting same result (or output). So here my question is how abstract classes helps us?

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For future reference, looking at something, creating a tiny example where that something isn't necessary, and inferring "that something is not useful" is not a good strategy. Googling for abstract class would likely turn up more useful and complete examples. –  Sebastian Redl Apr 17 '13 at 12:46
    
@SebastianRedl: To me, I asked the question when I really did not find proper example in google. When I asked to myself why is it required (see question), I found no answer. That is why I asked. –  Rasmi Ranjan Nayak Apr 17 '13 at 13:06
    
@All:- I understood the concept. Thanks A Lot. You people are amazing. Thanks to StackOverflow. –  Rasmi Ranjan Nayak Apr 17 '13 at 13:14

7 Answers 7

up vote 6 down vote accepted

As you've noticed, in your example code there is no point having separate base and derived classes.

In general, the purpose of classes with virtual functions is dynamic polymorphism, but your code hasn't used it.

Suppose you had some code that used a base* without knowing which (of several) derived classes it actually points to. Suppose that they each have different implementations of abstract(). Suppose that you want to force anyone who writes a derived class of base to implement their own version of abstract(). Then there's a reason to make abstract() a pure virtual function and hence a reason for base to be an abstract class:

#include <iostream>
#include <cstdlib>
#include <ctime>

struct Base {
    virtual void abstract() = 0;
    virtual ~Base() {};
};

struct Derived1 : Base {
    void abstract() { std::cout << "Derived1\n"; }
};

struct Derived2 : Base {
    void abstract() { std::cout << "Derived2\n"; }
};

Base *random_object() {
    if (std::rand() < RAND_MAX/2) {
        return new Derived1();
    } else {
        return new Derived2();
    }
}

int main() {
    std::srand(std::time(0));
    Base *b = random_object();
    b->abstract();
    delete b;
}

The code in main only cares about Base, it doesn't need to know anything about derived classes beyond the fact that there might be some. Only the code in random_object knows about the derived classes. Meanwhile Base doesn't need to know how abstract() is implemented, only the derived classes do (and each one only cares about its own implementation). It's good for code not to need to know about things -- it means those things can be changed without touching the code that doesn't care.

There are also some high-level design issues around using a non-abstract class as a public base class. For example, it's quite easy to unthinkingly write code that won't work as you expect once some of your functions have been overridden, and it's quite easy to accidentally slice an object with a concrete base class. So there's a philosophy that says you should know at all times whether you're writing a concrete class or a base class, and not try to do both at once. When you follow this philosophy, all base classes are abstract, so you make a class abstract to signal that it is designed to be derived from.

share|improve this answer
    
Could you please provide a small code snippet for me to have better understanding? Please –  Rasmi Ranjan Nayak Apr 17 '13 at 11:22
    
Inheriting from non-abstract classes is useful for Mixins if you use private inheritance. As a rule of thumb: Do not user inheritance if you want to model a has-a relationship. –  Code Clown Apr 17 '13 at 11:24
    
@CodeClown: yes, private inheritance is special. –  Steve Jessop Apr 17 '13 at 11:34
    
@SteveJessop: Thanks for the example. –  Rasmi Ranjan Nayak Apr 17 '13 at 13:42

Steve Jessop already pointed out why abstract classes and virtual functions are needed. You can force a vtable to be used to achieve dynamic dispatch.

Your abstract base class declares the common features for your derived classes. The virtual function ensures that the correct function is called if the object's type cannot be determined at compile time.

In the following example, the class other does not know at compile time which derivate of class shape is provided. The only thing known is: each shape derivate will provide an implementation for the center method since it is pure virtual. (The program won't compile and link otherwise.) This is sufficient to provide functionality. The program will determine the type of shPtr at runtime and call the correct center().

#include <string>
#include <iostream>

using namespace std;

class v2d
{
public: 
  double x, y;
  v2d (void) : x(0.0), y(0.0) { }
  v2d (double const a, double const b) : x(a), y(b) { }
};


class shape
{
public:
  string name;
  shape (void) : name() { }
  shape (string const n) : name(n) { }
  virtual v2d center (void) const = 0;
};


class circle : public shape 
{
private:
  v2d center_point;
  double radius;
public:
  circle (void) : shape("Circle"), center_point(), radius(0.0) { }
  circle (v2d const cp, double const r) : shape("Circle"), center_point(cp), radius(r) { }
  v2d center (void) const { return center_point; }
};

class square : public shape
{
private:
  v2d lowright;
  double sidelength;
public:
  square (void) : shape("Square"), lowright(), sidelength(0.0) { }
  square (v2d const tl, double const sl) : shape("Square"), lowright(tl), sidelength(sl) { }
  v2d center (void) const
  {
    double const halflen = sidelength/2.0;
    return v2d(lowright.x+halflen, lowright.y+halflen);
  }
};


class other
{
private:
  shape *shPtr;
public:
  other (void) : shPtr(NULL) { }
  other (shape *sh_ptr) : shPtr(sh_ptr) { }
  void doSomething (void)
  {
    cout << "Center of this Shape, which is a " << shPtr->name << " is: "<< shPtr->center().x << ", " << shPtr->center().y << endl;
  }
};



int main (void) 
{

  v2d sq_c(1.0, 2.0), circ_c(4.0, 4.0);
  square square_obj(sq_c, 5.0);
  circle circle_obj(circ_c, 2.0);

  other other1 (&square_obj), other2(&circle_obj);

  cout << fixed << setprecision(2);

  other1.doSomething();
  other2.doSomething();

  return 0;
}

The output is

Center of this Shape, which is a Square is: 3.50, 4.50
Center of this Shape, which is a Circle is: 4.00, 4.00

being perfectly correct (meaning the correct center functions have been called).

-Edit for clarity-

The animals example of SuvP is almost suited, too. It has the downside that no inheritance would be needed to achieve the same functionality.

I adjusted it a litte, trying to make the benefit of pure virtuality clear. First of all the user can add any arbitrary Animal and the implementation of feed_all_animals is independant of the present derived Animals.

#include <string>
#include <iostream>
#include <vector>

using namespace std;

class Animal
{
public:
  virtual string food() = 0;
  virtual string name() = 0; 
  void eat()  { cout << "A " << name() << " is eating " << food() << endl; }
};

class Dog:public Animal
{
public:
  string name() { return "Dog"; }
  string food() { return "Meat"; }
};

class Horse:public Animal
{
public:
  string name() { return "Horse"; }
  string food() { return "Gras"; }
};

void feed_all_animals (vector<Animal*> animals)
{
  for (size_t i=0; i<animals.size(); ++i)
  {
    cout << "Feeding animal " << i+1 << " (a " << animals[i]->name() << ") with " << animals[i]->food() << endl;
    animals[i]->eat();
  }
}

int main (void)
{
  vector<Animal*> animals;
  // We have a zoo with three dogs and two horses
  Dog dog1, dog2, dog3;
  Horse horse1, horse2;
  animals.push_back((Animal*)&dog1);
  animals.push_back((Animal*)&dog2);
  animals.push_back((Animal*)&dog3);
  animals.push_back((Animal*)&horse1);
  animals.push_back((Animal*)&horse2);
  // now we let the user add another animal
  int ani(0);
  cout << "Do you want to add a Horse [1] or a Dog [0]: ";
  cin >> ani;
  switch (ani)
  {
    case 1: animals.push_back((Animal*)new Horse); break;
    default: animals.push_back((Animal*)new Dog); break;
  }
  // so they don't starve
  feed_all_animals(animals);

  delete animals[animals.size()-1];
  animals.clear();
  return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Your example is quite good (I think). But it is quite difficult for me to understand :). Because I am not an expert in C++, anyhow Thanks for your help. –  Rasmi Ranjan Nayak Apr 17 '13 at 13:40

Here's an example for you: Let's say your program needs to calculate the area of different shapes.

class shape{
public:
    virtual double area() = 0;
};

class triangle:public shape{
public:
    triangle(double base, double height) : b(base), h(height) {}
    double area(){ return 0.5 * b * h; }
private:
    double b;
    double h;
};

class circle:public shape{
public:
    circle(double radius) : r(radius) {}
    double area(){ return M_PI * r * r; }
private:
    double r;
};

int main{
    std::vector<shape*> shapes;

    //add whatever shapes you want here
    shapes.push_back( new triangle(4, 5) );
    shapes.push_back( new circle(3) );

    double dTotal = 0.0;
    std::vector<shape*>::iterator i;
    for (i = shapes.begin(); i != shapes.end(); i++)
    {
        dTotal += (*i)->area();
        delete *i;
    }

    cout << dTotal;
    return 0;
}

You could now very easily create shapes for rectangle, circle, dodecahedron, etc and treat them all similarly without knowing the specifics of how they compute their own areas. At the same time, it doesn't make sense for shape to define an area of its own.

EDIT: added another derived class and made use of them using the abstract method.

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you could add that this example models a Is-a realtionschip. Read: A triangle is a shape. –  Code Clown Apr 17 '13 at 11:28
    
@metalhead:- As you have written it doesn't make sense for shape to define an area of its own.. Here I have one question, if I would like to claculate area of a circle the I have to make a class like class circle:public shape{double area {/*Definition*/}};. Then almost I am spending same effort with or without creating abstract class –  Rasmi Ranjan Nayak Apr 17 '13 at 11:29
    
@RasmiRanjanNayak: but if I want to have an array of various types of shapes and just add up the areas of all of them, I would not be able to do this if they were not all derived from the same base. –  metalhead Apr 17 '13 at 12:35
1  
@RasmiRanjanNayak: i added more to the example to illuminate my previous comment. –  metalhead Apr 17 '13 at 12:43
    
@metalhead: Thanks a Lot Sir –  Rasmi Ranjan Nayak Apr 17 '13 at 13:42

Abstract Classes can also be helpful in cases where you don't want an object to be created of a Class.

Consider this,

/* Abstract Class Animal */
class Animal
{
public:
    virtual void eat() = 0;
    virtual void walk() = 0;
};

class Dog:public Animal
{
public:
    void walk() { std::cout<<"\nWalk with Paws"; }   
    void eat()  { std::cout<<"\nEat meat";       }
};

class Horse:public Animal
{
public:
        void walk() {  std::cout<<"\nWalk with Hooves"; }   
        void eat()  {  std::cout<<"\nEat Grass";        }
};

int main()
{
    Dog d;
    Horse h;

    d.eat();
    d.walk();
    h.eat();
    h.walk();
return 0;
}

Here , you don't want an object of type Animal to be created. That object doesn't have any specific behaviour for sleep eat etc.

You can utilise this abstract class for creating subclasses like Dog, Cat etc pure virtual functions have to be implemented by the derived class or else the compiler gives an error.

This guarantees all your sub classes will have the desired methods and also you don't end up creating a undefined object such as Animal

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1  
Instead of pseudo code an C++ would be useful as inheritance tend to be differently implemented in various languages and it a C++ question. –  Code Clown Apr 17 '13 at 11:29
1  
@CodeClown I was more comfortable with Java :P Anyway thanks for making me try it in C++ –  Suvarna Apr 17 '13 at 11:44

In "abstract" words, abstract classes (also called interfaces when fully abstract) abstract from the implementation of a set of similar classes. Here, similar means they have the same set of functions but might implement them differently.

The abstract class itself doesn't define the implementation. Passing (pointers or references to) abstract classes around in your program only passes one "closed package" around, with which you can interact (e.g. shake). But you hide what's inside the package, including how the interface is implemented (e.g. what happens when you shake it).

That said, abstract classes just take the abstraction one level higher. A class describes what attributes and behavior an object has, but an abstract class only describes what you can do with an object. Only an actual implementation defines the behavior.

This being said, one important fact is that you can't create instances of an abstract class.

When designing a piece of software, abstract classes / interfaces are a very important method of abstraction. Whenever some piece of your software wants to interact with something it doesn't know in particular, you could write an interface which describes what features such an object has to provide without specifying the actual type. This makes it possible to easily pass objects of different types around. The function which takes a pointer / reference to such an interface / abstract class can interact with the object without knowing its actual type.

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Abstract classes hide nothing. Hiding is not the goal as with abstract classes implementation is undefined. –  Code Clown Apr 17 '13 at 11:26
    
I meant: when passing pointers of the abstract class around, the implementation is hidden. Corrected. –  leemes Apr 17 '13 at 11:28

The purpose of an abstract (base-)class is to define an interface for sub-classes. This way you can determine what your class must be capable of (its methods), but not how it does things (the implementation).
When you derive from an abstract class you promise to provide a certain behavior in your sub-class. Using this, functions can use your objects and perform their actions without knowing their specific behavior to the detail.
There are class-hierarchies all around, like in .NET-framework to represent concepts or things like UI-controls.
Secondly, it sometimes does not make sense to have an instance of a class. Consider a class Animal. How is Animal defined? It doesn't make sense to instantiate an Animal, but rather a Dog or a Cat, derived from Animal.

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Btw, you could just as well say that it doesn't make sense to instantiate a Dog, but rather a Dalmation or a Labrador derived from Dog. It's very much specific to a particular problem domain, how to organise a class hierarchy that corresponds to a taxonomy. –  Steve Jessop Apr 17 '13 at 11:57
    
Yes, agreed, of course it depends on the particular case. But you get my point, I guess. –  bash.d Apr 17 '13 at 12:00
    
I certainly get your point, but then I've seen the point made before (generally with the same examples, just like composition is always cars) ;-) Readers can just be aware that there's nothing special about the word "animal" that means it's inevitably an abstract class while "dog" isn't. The safe option is to define an abstract class Dog : Animal and a concrete class DogImpl : Dog. Then if you later change your mind and want to refine the taxonomy by introducing Dalmation and Labrador, you can slot them in without changing the Dog abstract class that other code might already use. –  Steve Jessop Apr 17 '13 at 12:04
    
Yes, this would probably be the dot-on-the-i. I get your intention. –  bash.d Apr 17 '13 at 12:07

Abstract classes are used to provide an interface for some functionality, where the exact behaviour is defined by the caller's class. To ensure that the "user" of the function implements their functions, you use abstract functions in the base-class. That way, if the "user" doesn't provide one of the required functions, the code doesn't compile.

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Abstract methods ensure that every derived class will keep its promise to fulfill the interface promise. It is useful when you know, that another developer will rely on it. –  Code Clown Apr 17 '13 at 11:22

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