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I'm using Console.WriteLine() from a very simple WPF test application, but when I execute the application from the command line, I'm seeing nothing being written to the console. Does anyone know what might be going on here?

I can reproduce it by creating a WPF application in VS 2008, and simply adding Console.WriteLine("text") anywhere that get executed. Any ideas?

All I need for right now is something as simple as Console.WriteLine(). I realize I could use log4net or somet other logging solution, but I really don't need that much functionality for this application.

Edit: I should have remembered that Console.WriteLine() is for console applications. Oh well, no stupid questions, right? :-) I'll just use System.Diagnostics.Trace.WriteLine() and DebugView for now.

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8 Answers

up vote 44 down vote accepted

You'll have to create a Console window manually before you actually call any Console.Write methods. That will init the Console to work properly without changing the project type (which for WPF application won't work).

Here's a complete source code example, of how a ConsoleManager class might look like, and how it can be used to enable/disable the Console, independently of the project type.

With the following class, you just need to write ConsoleManager.Show() somewhere before any call to Console.Write...

[SuppressUnmanagedCodeSecurity]
public static class ConsoleManager
{
    private const string Kernel32_DllName = "kernel32.dll";

    [DllImport(Kernel32_DllName)]
    private static extern bool AllocConsole();

    [DllImport(Kernel32_DllName)]
    private static extern bool FreeConsole();

    [DllImport(Kernel32_DllName)]
    private static extern IntPtr GetConsoleWindow();

    [DllImport(Kernel32_DllName)]
    private static extern int GetConsoleOutputCP();

    public static bool HasConsole
    {
        get { return GetConsoleWindow() != IntPtr.Zero; }
    }

    /// <summary>
    /// Creates a new console instance if the process is not attached to a console already.
    /// </summary>
    public static void Show()
    {
        //#if DEBUG
        if (!HasConsole)
        {
            AllocConsole();
            InvalidateOutAndError();
        }
        //#endif
    }

    /// <summary>
    /// If the process has a console attached to it, it will be detached and no longer visible. Writing to the System.Console is still possible, but no output will be shown.
    /// </summary>
    public static void Hide()
    {
        //#if DEBUG
        if (HasConsole)
        {
            SetOutAndErrorNull();
            FreeConsole();
        }
        //#endif
    }

    public static void Toggle()
    {
        if (HasConsole)
        {
            Hide();
        }
        else
        {
            Show();
        }
    }

    static void InvalidateOutAndError()
    {
        Type type = typeof(System.Console);

        System.Reflection.FieldInfo _out = type.GetField("_out",
            System.Reflection.BindingFlags.Static | System.Reflection.BindingFlags.NonPublic);

        System.Reflection.FieldInfo _error = type.GetField("_error",
            System.Reflection.BindingFlags.Static | System.Reflection.BindingFlags.NonPublic);

        System.Reflection.MethodInfo _InitializeStdOutError = type.GetMethod("InitializeStdOutError",
            System.Reflection.BindingFlags.Static | System.Reflection.BindingFlags.NonPublic);

        Debug.Assert(_out != null);
        Debug.Assert(_error != null);

        Debug.Assert(_InitializeStdOutError != null);

        _out.SetValue(null, null);
        _error.SetValue(null, null);

        _InitializeStdOutError.Invoke(null, new object[] { true });
    }

    static void SetOutAndErrorNull()
    {
        Console.SetOut(TextWriter.Null);
        Console.SetError(TextWriter.Null);
    }
}
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I like this, it works, & I can use this in other projects. However because it launches a new console window it causes an issue with a current project. If I pass in command line options would like to be able to output to the console that it was launched from so the user gets the output there. In my app if command line options are provided it stays a console app and then does its work and then exits. This allows for the app to be automated and schedule to do tasks, or the user can just do something quickly and get out. However I want to output some things , like the help usage stuff, etc. –  Rodney Foley Jan 29 '10 at 23:56
    
Thanks for posting this, it has really helped me –  ดาว Apr 8 '10 at 12:43
1  
It's possible to try to call AttachConsole(-1) first and check its return value to attach to the parent process' console; if it returns false, call AllocConsole. However, the application still 'returns' first and only then outputs to the console, I'll post more if I find a solution. Also, if you set the WPF app type to Console Application, the problem disappears but you can't detach the console without it showing on the screen briefly when the program is started, so it kinda looks awkward (but if you can live with it, it works great). –  Alex Paven Dec 16 '10 at 8:25
1  
Why do this when the answer from Brian works as well and much easier. –  Wouter Janssens - Xelos bvba Feb 10 '12 at 9:55
1  
@Mark Yeah, but it doesn't work... There's a SetConsoleCtrlHandler function that allows to be notified when the CTRL_CLOSE_EVENT event happens but you can't do anything with it, there's nothing that's allowing your application to continue. You will be shut down. If you feel like hacking, you could probably swap the windows message handler for the console process and just drop the WM_CLOSE message, I have never tried this but it could work. It's just another window but with that said, unless you want to entertain this idea you effort is probably better spent doing something else. –  John Leidegren Aug 27 '13 at 18:08
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Right click on the project, "Properties", "Application" tab, change "Output Type" to "Console Application", and then it will also have a console.

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A WPF application will not launch properly like that... –  John Leidegren Apr 5 '09 at 7:12
39  
A WPF application will launch properly like that... –  ing0 Mar 4 '10 at 20:18
1  
It did launch.. –  Deacon Frost Mar 22 '11 at 12:14
1  
The only issue with that is you will have a cmd open in the background, but it works :). –  ykatchou May 2 '12 at 9:22
1  
Great, but command-line window will be created when application is not executed from cmd.exe (two windows created for one application). But for this there is also solution: you can hide cmd window by ShowWindow(hWnd, 0). stackoverflow.com/a/10416180/1457197 . Using this solution you will see text in console only when WPF application is executed from command-line. –  CoperNick May 9 '13 at 17:44
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You can use

Trace.WriteLine("text");

This will output to the "Output" window in Visual Studio (when debugging).

make sure to have the Diagnostics assembly included:

using System.Diagnostics;
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Thanks it helped me a lot when debugging a multi-threaded application! –  J4N Jun 19 '12 at 13:36
    
Easy, simple. Thx –  Pan.student Oct 15 '12 at 11:27
2  
this is the best answer, but has not the highest rating –  kiltek Oct 19 '13 at 9:33
    
I agree - this is exactly what op is asking for. Great alternative to Console.WriteLine() - the solution marked as the answer is a neat exercise but unreasonable to include in a production application. –  nocarrier Nov 23 '13 at 23:01
    
PS for Windows Store apps (Windows Runtime) the equivalent of Trace.WriteLine is Debug.WriteLine() –  nocarrier Nov 23 '13 at 23:05
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Although John Leidegren keeps shooting down the idea, Brian is correct. I've just got it working in Visual Studio.

To be clear a WPF application does not create a Console window by default.

You have to create a WPF Application and then change the OutputType to "Console Application". When you run the project you will see a console window with your WPF window in front of it.

It doesn't look very pretty, but I found it helpful as I wanted my app to be run from the command line with feedback in there, and then for certain command options I would display the WPF window.

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I use Console.WriteLine() for use in the Output window...

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you did not understand the question... –  ykatchou May 2 '12 at 9:20
    
It's a 4 year old question that's been edited heavily since I first saw it. Now of course the question has been better worded and my response was made irrelevant. –  Erode May 2 '12 at 16:42
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It's possible to see output intended for console by using command line redirection.

For example:

C:\src\bin\Debug\Example.exe > output.txt

will write all the content to output.txt file.

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Great solution was presented. However, the observable impossibility not to create the additional console on cmd programm execution is not good. Ok, we can mark the executable PE as a console app, but would it be possible then to close the console not closing the app itself when we run it just not in the CMD ?

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It is possible. ShowWindow(hWnd, 0). See: stackoverflow.com/a/10416180/1457197 –  CoperNick May 9 '13 at 17:56
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As far as I know, Console.WriteLine() is only for console applications. I think this is your problem.

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1  
I don't know about WPF, but this certainly isn't the case for WinForms. Console.WriteLine works fine there, but, of course, you won't see the console, you will see it in the Debugger output window and if you listen to the standard output. –  Jeff Yates Oct 2 '08 at 4:13
2  
you can set the project to a Console application and it will still run as a Windows app but it will also have a visible console –  Mark Cidade Oct 8 '08 at 16:32
    
That's incorrect, the build process of a non console application does not attach a console by deffault. You can do this manually by calling the AllocConsole() Win32 API function before any call to Console.Write, the Console class will then be initialized to work with that Console window. –  John Leidegren Apr 5 '09 at 7:11
    
This does not provide an answer to the question. To critique or request clarification from an author, leave a comment below their post. –  geedubb Apr 14 at 19:45
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