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I am writting a small project, a page where non registered users can access only few pages, registered ones to other few, and some of the registered ones to others. It's for a game, so only these playing a 'match' would have access to the latter. Furthermore, there will be some pages for us, the admins (secret pages). This is the structure:

$Public_Path = '/public_html/public/';
$Private_Path = '/public_html/private/';
$Secret_Path = '/public_html/secret/';

I pass everything through /public_html/index.php and include the files from there. I thought it would be better to have all the include and redirect in one place instead of scattered around at the beginning of each file. The thing is, code starts to get messy in here, and there's still many more options to add. Is there a schema that simplifies it? This is how my code looks right now:

// Some extra code goes here

// If an unregistered user tries to go anywhere he shouldn't
if (!file_exists($Public_Path . $Url . '/index.php') && empty($User))
  header ('Location: /login/');

// PUBLIC. Load the public pages
if (file_exists($Public_Path . $Url . '/index.php'))
  include $Public_Path . $Url . '/index.php';

// SECRET. Only for admin
else if (file_exists($Secret_Path . $Url . '/index.php') && in_array($User->email, $Admins))
  include $Secret_Path . $Url . '/index.php';

// PRIVATE. Load the template and include private pages
else if (file_exists($Private_Path . $Url . '/index.php'))
  {
  if ($UrlArray[0] != 'games' && $User->game == 0)
    header ('Location: /games/');

  if ($UrlArray[1] == 'save')
    include $Private_Path . $Url . '/index.php';
  else
    {
    $Page = $Private_Path . $Url . '/index.php';
    include $Include_Path . 'template.php';
    }
  }

// 404. Nor public nor private nor secret
else
  header ('Location: /error/404');

Note: I know the limitation of only being able to access index.php with this, I imposed that myself.

My question is, how can I order this code in some fashion that allows me to add much more functionality but increasing only a little the complexity? How to reduce the latter?

share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

I would consider a couple of options:

Add a session variable (say, $_SESSION['userPath']), and when the user logs in, take them to their authorized path:

$path = (isset($_SESSION['userPath']))?$_SESSION['userPath']:FALSE;

if($path){
  include $path . $Url . '/index.php';
} else {
  header ('Location: /login/');
}

You format works well for expansion, but it may be semantically easier to read if you change it to a switch statement. This would require you to get it down to one variable (such as the $_SESSION['userPath']) variable mentioned above.

switch ($path){
  case "Public_Path":
    header ('Location: /login/');
    break;
  case "Private_Path":
     if ($UrlArray[0] != 'games' && $User->game == 0){
      header ('Location: /games/');
     }
     if ($UrlArray[1] == 'save'){
      include $Private_Path . $Url . '/index.php';
     } else {
      $Page = $Private_Path . $Url . '/index.php';
      include $Include_Path . 'template.php';
     }
    break;
  case "Secret_Path":
    if (in_array($User->email, $Admins){
      include $path . $Url . '/index.php';
    }
    break;
  case "New_Path":
    include $path . $Url . '/index.php';
    break;

   // ...

  case default:
    header ('Location: /error/404');
}

Finally, if you use an AJAX solution, rather than redirect, the page would reload to the viewer appropriate location. In this case, no redirect would be necessary at all, but rather, just loading the required elements at the time of need.

share|improve this answer
    
That just gave me an idea, I will use a switch for the user and an array partly retrieved from the database to check whether the user can access the page or not. I didn't really understood what you meant with the $_SESSION['userPath'] though, can you explain a little further what would be in there? –  Francisco Presencia Apr 18 '13 at 0:22
    
A session variable is a value stored on the server, linked to a cookie on the user's computer. They always start with $_SESSION in the same way $_POST, $_GET, $_FILE are reserved system variables. As part of the user login script, I usually set several session variables associated with the user (I name a variable "authority", make it an array, and loop through the permissions assigned to that user.) The path you want the user to be shown (based upon Login ID) would be set in their $_SESSION variable, retrieved and set on login. Each page checks the $_SESSION variable first. –  Sable Foste Apr 18 '13 at 12:57

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