Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

Currently in my project I have two static methods PushObjects and ProcessObject. The PushObject method pushes back data to a static deque and this method can be accessed by multiple threads but the ProcessObject is always used by a single thread and is used to retrieve objects from the top and remove them.Now my problem is no matter what I try I always eventually (sooner or later get a deque iterator not dereferencable error.Any suggestions on what I could do to stop this issue. An abstract of my PushObjects and ProcessObjectare given below

    void foo::PushObjects(obj A)
    {
        try
        {
            {//Begin Lock
                boost::lock_guard<boost::mutex> lock(mutex_push);
                mydeque.push_back(A);
            }//End Lock
            condition_read.notify_one(); //Inform the reader that it could start reading 
        }
        catch (std::exception& e)
        {
            __debugbreak();
        }
    }


    This is the static Reader method

    void foo::ProcessObject()
    {
        {//Begin Lock
            boost::unique_lock<boost::mutex> lock(mutex_process);
            while(true)
            {
                    while(mydeque.empty()) { condition_read.wait(lock); }
                    try
                    {
                        if(!mydeque.empty())
                        {
                                obj a = mydeque.front();
                                ......Process the object........
                                mydeque.pop_front();
                        }

                    }
                    catch (std::exception& e)
                    {
                        __debugbreak();
                    }
            }//end while
        }//End lock
    }

From what I have read is that iterators become invalid once items are added or removed from the deque. Is there a way to resolve this issue.

share|improve this question
    
boost::mutex::scoped_lock lock(lock); is clearly wrong. Do you still have problems if you remove that, and uncomment the more reasonable lock declaration in the line above? – Mike Seymour Apr 17 '13 at 12:17
    
Re "iterators become invalid": That's true, but you're not using any iterators here, so that's not a problem. – Mike Seymour Apr 17 '13 at 12:19
    
OK, but does your real code lock mutex_push (like the commented-out line would), or does it incorrectly initialise lock from itself without touching mutex_push (as the code you've posted does)? – Mike Seymour Apr 17 '13 at 12:22
    
FYI, the if(!mydeque.empty()) is not needed unless you have code somewhere that is modifying your deque without latching your deque mutex (and if you do, that is a clue you're not doing this right). Look at the code. Why did you just break the while() loop that is monitoring the cond-var? Hm... Also, does the conveniently-omitted super-secret code known only as ......Process the object........ ever unlatch the deque lock? Please, post real code. – WhozCraig Apr 17 '13 at 12:24
up vote 4 down vote accepted

It looks like you aren't using the same mutex (mutex_push vs mutex_process) for reading and writing from/to the deque. You need to be. It's not safe to write to memory and read from it at the same time on different threads.

Other notes:

obj a = mydeque.front();
......Process the object........
mydeque.pop_front();

could be much better if you manage your lock to have the minimum lock time...

obj a = std::move(mydeque.front());
mydeque.pop_front();
lock.unlock();
// process the object
lock.lock();

You likely don't need to be locked (or at least don't need the same lock) to process the object. This way your writer can still write to the deque while you are processing. Also to note is that there is nothing stopping you here from being multi producer multi consumer instead of just multi producer single consumer.

share|improve this answer
    
So if I use a single mutex for both then writing and reading wont be simultaneous. Currently it is Am I correct ? – Rajeshwar Apr 17 '13 at 12:21
    
@Rajeshwar You can't read and write simultaneously. You'll end up reading halfway through a write and get some garbled memory. That's why mutexes exist... so you can cause waits so you don't read and write or write and write simultaneously – David Apr 17 '13 at 12:23
    
Thanks. I am going to give this a run today - already refactored my code. Now Ill be using a single static mutex for both read and write. – Rajeshwar Apr 17 '13 at 12:29

You need to have single mutex for accessing mydeque no read/write mutexes. And any access to deque must be while mutex locked. Even you just checking empty(). Since deque operations are not atomic you may end up with mydeque.empty() returning false, while being in some seminonempty state in a middle of push_back. Thus you need boost::lock_guard<boost::mutex> lock(mutex_push); prior to each access to the mydeque. or during whole operation that changes deque content.

share|improve this answer

To expand Dave's answer regarding unlocking as soon as possible to allow concurrent writes while you are processing your items...

Your deque may well contain several items (which have been pushed eg. while you were still processing another item). In order to avoid locking for each and every item you could just swap your deque with an empty, local one and process your items from that local deque. Some code will make it clearer:

while (true) {
    std::deque<Obj> tmp_deque;
    {
        std::unique_lock<std::mutex> lock(mutex);
        while (mydeque.empty())
            condition.wait(lock);
        mydeque.swap(tmp_deque);
    }
    while (!tmp_deque.empty()) {
        Obj obj = std::move(tmp_deque.front());
        tmp_deque.pop_front();
        // process obj
    }
}

This way, instead of lock / get 1 item / unlock / process 1 item you end up with lock / get all items / unlock / process all items which is much more efficient since locking mutexes are a big performance hit.

Clearly, this is only for a single-consumer model. If you have multiple consumers you really don't want to enqueue all items in a single consumer and let all the other consumers go idle.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.