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I am perl beginner, I am reading upon grep function to filter a list. I came across the following program.

#!/usr/bin/perl

use strict;
use warnings;

# initialize an array
my @array = qw(3 4 5 6 7 8 9);

# first syntax form:
my @subArray = grep { $_ & 1 } @array;

the statement my @subArray = grep { $_ & 1 } @array; returns odd-numbers in @array. I didn't understand how the expression($_ & 1) works. I searched in Google but did not found any useful links.

  • Is that any kind of special operator ?

  • Are there any other variants of that EXPR ?

Thanks in Advance.

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FYI: this is a very neat hack that should never be used in production code unless the operation of finding only odd elements is benchmarked to be a performance bottleneck in a more-readable implementation. –  DVK Apr 17 '13 at 13:51
    
@DVK Hm, As for my interest: does this tip used? $_||=$val –  gaussblurinc Apr 17 '13 at 13:54
    
@loldop - ||= operator is perfectly proper idiomatic Perl, not a hack. However, using $_ as opposed to using a self-documentedly-named-variavle is very frequently a sign of poorly written code unless used in a very short map/grep block. –  DVK Apr 17 '13 at 13:57
    
@VARamesh, I think, you could use this expression: ($_%2) elements, that have rest 1 in ring modulo 2 –  gaussblurinc Apr 17 '13 at 14:02
    
@DVK Thanks for information. –  V A Ramesh Apr 17 '13 at 15:21

5 Answers 5

up vote 9 down vote accepted

$_ is the variable holding the currently tested value, & is the binary AND operator, and 1 is just the number one. This expression combines all the bits of both $_ and 1 with each other by logical AND. So it returns 1 if the value is odd and 0 if the value is even.

As an example, lets assume $_ is 123 then it's binary representation would be 1111011. The decimal number 1 would be 00000001, so combining all bits by AND you get

123 = 1111011
  1 = 0000001
      - AND -
      0000001 = 1

Another example 200 & 100

200 = 11001000
100 = 01100100
      - AND --
      01000000 = 64
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In the second example(200 & 100), does the answer is 64 or my way of conversion is wrong ? –  V A Ramesh Apr 17 '13 at 12:49
    
You are right, that has to be 64 of course. The 128 was an error on my part. –  tauli Apr 17 '13 at 12:52

As many have pointed out, & is the bitwise-and operator. This means that the two numbers that are compared are turned into bits and compared:

For example, 3 & 1 returns 1, which evaluates to true inside the grep:

Num | Bits
----+-----
  3 | 1 1
& 1 | 0 1
----+-----
  1 | 0 1   <- result of 'and'ing each bit column

Similarly, 4 & 1 returns 0, which is false:

Num | Bits
----+-------
  4 | 1 0 0
& 1 | 0 0 1
----+-------
  0 | 0 0 0  <- all zeros because no column contains 1 & 1

That said, An alternative way to filter odd numbers is to mod the number with 2:

my @odd = grep { $_ % 2 } 1 .. 7;    # 1, 3, 5, 7
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grep{ $_ & 1}

Will go over every element of your array and do a bit-wise match with 1 This means that grep will match any element that has a 1 as last (lsb) bit. Since only odd numbers have a 1 as lsb this will only return odd numbers

&  is the bitwise AND 
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$_ is the current expression. In this case each array element.

& is the binary AND operator.

So, in short, the grep will match any array element that is an odd number.

The use of $_ with grep is documented in the perldoc. The meaning of & is also in the perldoc.

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$_ is a variable set by the grep function. Most of the perl functions manipulate $_ if not specified otherwise. Grep calls the defined anonymous sub (which is { $_ & 1 }) for each elements of @array and makes a bitwise &. If the result is a true value, then it is added to the resulting array.

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