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I have a C#.net method as given below

 public string jsonTest()
        {
            List<string> list = new List<string>();
            list.Add("aa");
            list.Add("bb");
            list.Add("cc");
            string output = JsonConvert.SerializeObject(list);
            return output;          
        }

Here eventhough Im creating a Json object by using JsonConvert.SerializeObject I am getting a string (since return type is string).

Can I do like below by using a return type JsonResult (or somthing like that) something like what we can do in MVC?

  return Json(new { data = list }, JsonRequestBehavior.AllowGet);

Is it possible to create a Json data in asp.net?

In client side I'm using an ajax call to get data from jsonTest().

  $.ajax({
                type: 'GET',
                url: "test.aspx",  //In test.aspx pageload calling jsonTest()
                dataType: 'json',
                success: function (data) {
                    alert(data);
                },
                error: function (data) {
                    alert("In error");
                }

            });

When I'm giving dataType: 'json', it will go to error part (Since the ajax expects json data but it gets string). Thats why I want to parse it as a json object in server side.

share|improve this question
    
Do you want it like that for Server-side consumption or client-side? What are you trying to accomplish/do with the result? –  Dane Balia Apr 17 '13 at 12:36
    
If you are talking able creating an asp webmethod you return type of string and use the Json serializer to convert the object –  cgatian Apr 17 '13 at 12:38
    
    
is this supposed to be a WebMethod? If so, just make your return type List<string> and it will automatically serialize to JSON (not an escaped "JSON-string") –  BLSully Apr 17 '13 at 13:30

4 Answers 4

If ASP.NET,

string output = JsonConvert.SerializeObject(list);
Response.Clear();
Response.ContentType = "application/json; charset=utf-8";
Response.Write(output);
Response.End();
share|improve this answer
    
Its working fine if Im not using dataType: 'json' in ajax. Otherwise its showing alert("In error"); –  Sudha Apr 18 '13 at 12:12

There is nothing called a JSON object. The SerializeObject method returns a string because JSON is nothing more than a string value which follows specific rules.

To return JSON to the browser all you need to do is:

Response.ContentType = "application/json; charset=utf-8";
Response.Write(jsonTest());
Response.End();
share|improve this answer

I'm going to assume you're trying to create a WebMethod for consumption by a JavaScript XHR call or similiar:

ASP.NET will auto-serialize to JSON for POST requests only (using ASMX or so called "Page Methods"). WCF and WebAPI do not require the POST method, but do require some configuration.

[WebMethod]
public static List<Task> TasksGet(string projectId) {
    return MyNamespace.Tasks.GetForProject(projectId);
}

The result your JS call sees would be something like:

{"d": [{
     "__type": "MyNamespace.Task", 
     "id": 1, 
     "description": "This is my first task"
   }, {
     "__type": "MyNamespace.Task", 
     "id": 2, 
     "description": "This is my second task"
   }, {
     ....etc etc
   }
]}

No need to mess around w/ the JsonSerializer class directly.

Also make sure your request headers are set correctly:

Content-Accept: application/json;charset=UTF8

share|improve this answer

Json is just string data. It is how that string is interpreted. So the fact that it is returning a string is correct. You mentioned ASP.Net. Are you using ASP.Net webforms and looking for a way to return that JSON to the front side?

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I think you ment to say a comment –  cgatian Apr 17 '13 at 12:37
    
Why the downvote? –  uriDium Apr 17 '13 at 12:42

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