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I am using pyserial to open a python connection:

self.fpga = serial.Serial(self.fpgaport, 115200, serial.EIGHTBITS, serial.PARITY_NONE, serial.STOPBITS_ONE, self.fpgapollinterval, False, False, None, False, None)

This matches with the pyserial documentation found here:

__init__(port=None, baudrate=9600, bytesize=EIGHTBITS, parity=PARITY_NONE, stopbits=STOPBITS_ONE, timeout=None, xonxoff=False, rtscts=False, writeTimeout=None, dsrdtr=False, interCharTimeout=None)

However, when I run the script, I get this error:

line 391, in run

self.fpga = serial.Serial(self.fpgaport, 115200, serial.EIGHTBITS, serial.PARITY_NONE, serial.STOPBITS_ONE, self.fpgapollinterval, False, False, None, False, None)

TypeError: __init__() takes at most 11 arguments (12 given)

When I take out the last argument (the last None), the error goes away.

I also printed out all of the variable names in case one was more than 1D. Not that, either.

I'm using python 2.6.6, the documentation is for pyserial 2.6. I have been struggling to find out how to find which version of serial I'm using.

Why does python claim I'm supplying 12 arguments when I'm only supplying 11? I must be missing something here.

EDIT:

How do I find out which serial version I have installed? This code I'm running is probably written for another version of python (and serial too). I need to find out what the serial version I have wants as arguments.

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2 Answers 2

up vote 8 down vote accepted

You are implicitly passing self as the first argument.


I know that this answer does not solve your problem, but that is the reason why your interpreter tells you that you are passing 12 arguments when you are indeed only passing 11 explicit ones. And so the answer does provide exactly that, an answer to your question. If you need further help with your program, ask a new, more specific question.

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you need to add self as the first argument to the init declaration. –  Ionut Hulub Apr 17 '13 at 12:38
    
How do I find out which serial version I have installed? This code I'm running is probably written for another version of python (and serial too). I need to find out which argument i need to take away in order to use my version of Serial correctly. –  Stacey Anne Apr 17 '13 at 12:42
    
It is usually written on the top of the module, you will have to look for the file yourself and open it in a editor to view the version. –  Inbar Rose Apr 17 '13 at 12:43
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Thanks for your answer, the argument discrepancy thing was the answer I really needed - I can figure out which arguments to pass, but the discrepancy in argument numbers was quite frustrating. –  Stacey Anne Apr 17 '13 at 12:47
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The twelfth argument is self, which is a reference to the object always passed to methods.

Check serial.VERSION for version, or do help(serial)

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Just realized this does not really answer the question if you are using serial.Serial out of pyserial, since that should take 11+self. Can you show your code? –  Fredrik Håård Apr 17 '13 at 12:41
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Ah! help(serial) gives VERSION = '1.35'. No wonder it isn't working, That's way behind version 2.6 for pyserial. –  Stacey Anne Apr 17 '13 at 12:50
    
Re: code, it's opensource. see miner.py: github.com/progranism/Open-Source-FPGA-Bitcoin-Miner/tree/… –  Stacey Anne Apr 17 '13 at 12:53
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