Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm trying to combine a list of functions like so.

I have this:

Func<int, bool>[] criteria = new Func<int, bool>[3];
criteria[0] = i => i % 2 == 0;
criteria[1] = i => i % 3 == 0;
criteria[2] = i => i % 5 == 0;

And I want this:

Func<int, bool>[] predicates = new Func<int, bool>[3];
predicates[0] = i => i % 2 == 0;
predicates[1] = i => i % 2 == 0 && i % 3 == 0;
predicates[2] = i => i % 2 == 0 && i % 3 == 0 && i % 5 == 0;

So far I've got the following code:

Expression<Func<int, bool>>[] results = new Expression<Func<int, bool>>[criteria.Length];

for (int i = 0; i < criteria.Length; i++)
{
    results[i] = f => true;
    for (int j = 0; j <= i; j++)
    {
        Expression<Func<int, bool>> expr = b => criteria[j](b);
        var invokedExpr = Expression.Invoke(
            expr, 
            results[i].Parameters.Cast<Expression>());
        results[i] = Expression.Lambda<Func<int, bool>>(
            Expression.And(results[i].Body, invokedExpr), 
            results[i].Parameters);
    }
}
var predicates = results.Select(e => e.Compile()).ToArray();

Console.WriteLine(predicates[0](6)); // Returns true
Console.WriteLine(predicates[1](6)); // Returns false
Console.WriteLine(predicates[2](6)); // Throws an IndexOutOfRangeException

Does anyone know what I'm doing wrong?

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

This was a guess, as I know little about this stuff, but this seems to fix it:

Func<int, bool>[] criteria = new Func<int, bool>[3]; 
            criteria[0] = i => i % 2 == 0; 
            criteria[1] = i => i % 3 == 0; 
            criteria[2] = i => i % 5 == 0;
            Expression<Func<int, bool>>[] results = new Expression<Func<int, bool>>[criteria.Length];
            for (int i = 0; i < criteria.Length; i++)
            {
                results[i] = f => true; 
                for (int j = 0; j <= i; j++)
                {
                    int ii = i;
                    int jj = j;
                    Expression<Func<int, bool>> expr = b => criteria[jj](b); 
                    var invokedExpr = Expression.Invoke(expr, results[ii].Parameters.Cast<Expression>()); 
                    results[ii] = Expression.Lambda<Func<int, bool>>(Expression.And(results[ii].Body, invokedExpr), results[ii].Parameters);
                }
            } 
            var predicates = results.Select(e => e.Compile()).ToArray();

The key is the introduction of 'ii' and 'jj' (maybe only one matters, I didn't try). I think you are capturing a mutable variable inside a lambda, and thus when you finally reference it, you're seeing the later-mutated value rather than the original value.

share|improve this answer
    
That fixed it. Only jj mattered. Thanks –  Cameron MacFarland Oct 2 '08 at 2:49

No need to pull in Expressions...

    Func<int, bool>[] criteria = new Func<int, bool>[3];
    criteria[0] = i => i % 2 == 0;
    criteria[1] = i => i % 3 == 0;
    criteria[2] = i => i % 5 == 0;

    Func<int, bool>[] predicates = new Func<int, bool>[3];

    predicates[0] = criteria[0];
    for (int i = 1; i < criteria.Length; i++)
    {
        //need j to be an unchanging int, one for each loop execution.
        int j = i;

        predicates[j] = x => predicates[j - 1](x) && criteria[j](x);
    }

    Console.WriteLine(predicates[0](6)); //True
    Console.WriteLine(predicates[1](6)); //True
    Console.WriteLine(predicates[2](6)); //False
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.