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I am working on a project where I need to be able to use a few persistent to talk to different servers over long periods of time. This server will have a fairly high throughput. I am having trouble figuring out a way to setup the persistent connections correctly. The best way I could think of to do this is create a persistent connection class. Ideally I would connect to the server one time, and do async_writes as information comes into me. And read information as it comes back to me. I don't think I am structuring my class correctly though.

Here is what I have built right now:

persistent_connection::persistent_connection(std::string ip, std::string port):
    io_service_(), socket_(io_service_), strand_(io_service_), is_setup_(false), outbox_()
{
    boost::asio::ip::tcp::resolver resolver(io_service_);
    boost::asio::ip::tcp::resolver::query query(ip,port);
    boost::asio::ip::tcp::resolver::iterator iterator = resolver.resolve(query);
    boost::asio::ip::tcp::endpoint endpoint = *iterator;
    socket_.async_connect(endpoint, boost::bind(&persistent_connection::handler_connect, this, boost::asio::placeholders::error, iterator));
    io_service_.poll();
}

void persistent_connection::handler_connect(const boost::system::error_code &ec, boost::asio::ip::tcp::resolver::iterator endpoint_iterator)
{
    if(ec)
    {
        std::cout << "Couldn't connect" << ec << std::endl;
        return;
    }
    else
    {
        boost::asio::socket_base::keep_alive option(true);
        socket_.set_option(option);
        boost::asio::async_read_until(socket_, buf_ ,"\r\n\r\n", boost::bind(&persistent_connection::handle_read_headers, this, boost::asio::placeholders::error));
    }
}

void persistent_connection::write(const std::string &message)
{
    write_impl(message);
    //strand_.post(boost::bind(&persistent_connection::write_impl, this, message));
}

void persistent_connection::write_impl(const std::string &message)
{
    outbox_.push_back(message);
    if(outbox_.size() > 1)
    {
        return;
    }
    this->write_to_socket();
}

void persistent_connection::write_to_socket()
{
    std::string message = "GET /"+ outbox_[0] +" HTTP/1.0\r\n";
    message += "Host: 10.1.10.120\r\n";
    message += "Accept: */*\r\n";
    boost::asio::async_write(socket_, boost::asio::buffer(message.c_str(), message.size()), strand_.wrap(
                             boost::bind(&persistent_connection::handle_write, this, boost::asio::placeholders::error, boost::asio::placeholders::bytes_transferred)));

}

void persistent_connection::handle_write(const boost::system::error_code& ec, std::size_t bytes_transfered)
{
    outbox_.pop_front();
    if(ec)
    {
        std::cout << "Send error" << boost::system::system_error(ec).what() << std::endl;
    }
    if(!outbox_.empty())
    {
        this->write_to_socket();
    }
    boost::asio::async_read_until(socket_, buf_ ,"\r\n\r\n",boost::bind(&persistent_connection::handle_read_headers, this, boost::asio::placeholders::error));
}

The first message I will send from this seems to send out fine, the server gets it, and responds with a valid response. I see two problem unfortunately:

1) My handle_write is never called after doing the async_write command, I have no clue why. 2) The program never reads the response, I am guessing this is related to #1, since asyn_read_until is not called until that function happens. 3) I was also wondering if someone could tell me why my commented out strand_.post call would not work.

I am guessing most of this has to due with my lack of knowledge of how I should be using my io_service, so if somebody could give me any pointer that would be greatly appreciated. And if you need any additional information, I would be glad to provide some more.

Thank you

Edit call to write:

int main()
{
    persistent_connection p("10.1.10.220", "80");
    p.write("100");
    p.write("200");
    barrier b(1,30000); //Timed mutex, waits for 300 seconds.
    b.wait();
}

and

void persistent_connection::handle_read_headers(const boost::system::error_code &ec)
{
    std::istream is(&buf_);
    std::string read_stuff;
    std::getline(is,read_stuff);
    std::cout << read_stuff << std::endl;
}
share|improve this question
    
In the code you posted, you are never calling write and the read handlers are not present. Can you provide that? –  Loghorn Apr 17 '13 at 13:44
    
Are you calling run of your io_service in multiple threads? Because if not, you won't need strands. An if you call it on multiple threads, you should use the strand to wrap every handler for the same object or else handlers of the same connection could get executed concurrently. –  Arne Mertz Apr 17 '13 at 13:53
    
I will be calling write from multiple threads. My structure of this program is a asio webserver. For each request in, I will parse the information, then send that parsed information out in a persistent connection. So each connection in will call write, and each connection will be on a different thread. –  Eumcoz Apr 17 '13 at 13:55
    
Updated OP with my main and read handler, sorry meant to have that in there –  Eumcoz Apr 17 '13 at 13:56

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

The behavior described is the result of the io_service_'s event loop no longer being processed.

The constructor invokes io_service::poll() which will run handlers that are ready to run and will not block waiting for work to finish, where as io_service::run() will block until all work has finished. Thus, when polling, if the other side of the connection has not written any data, then no handlers may be ready to run, and execution will return from poll().

With regards to threading, if each connection will have its own thread, and the communication is a half-duplex protocol, such as HTTP, then the application code may be simpler if it is written synchronously. On the other hand, if it each connection will have its own thread, but the code is written asynchronously, then consider handling exceptions being thrown from within the event loop. It may be worth reading Boost.Asio's effect of exceptions thrown from handlers.

Also, persistent_connection::write_to_socket() introduces undefined behavior. When invoking boost::asio::async_write(), it is documented that the caller retains ownership of the buffer and must guarantee that the buffer remains valid until the handler is called. In this case, the message buffer is an automatic variable, whose lifespan may end before the persistent_connection::handle_write handler is invoked. One solution could be to change the lifespan of message to match that of persistent_connection by making it a member variable.

share|improve this answer
    
My problem with writing this synchronously is that the server's I am connecting too may take up to 100ms to return information. So if I send out my two messages in the example, message 2 may finish before message 1. I need to build my server to be able to handle thousands of connections a second. So taking this into consideration, I figured sending out multiple requests at once over a single connection and receiving the information, and matching up who sent what with ID's would be viable. Is this not how I should be using asio sockets? –  Eumcoz Apr 17 '13 at 15:58
    
If each connection has its own thread and uses a half-duplex protocol, then there is very little (if anything) gained from asynchronous programming. It looks as though the code is attempting to perform full-duplex communication over HTTP, which has its own complications. If you are planning on handling thousands of connections a second, then you may want to consider using a thread pool and a protocol that supports full-duplex communication. –  Tanner Sansbury Apr 17 '13 at 17:13
    
Ok, I think I understand what you are saying now. I think I am going about this the wrong way. Instead of a few persistent connections which I wish to "stream" data over, I would be better off with making enough persistent connections to handle all of my requests going outbound, one at a time, and processing them all in a synchronous fashion. So if I get 10 requests every 100ms(and have a 100ms delay in response), I would need 10 persistent connections to handle my traffic, and I should just keep reusing them. –  Eumcoz Apr 17 '13 at 18:05

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