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In my project have an interface. In the interface have lot of methods. Our company other developers are inherited the interface in to some classes and implement the all method weather I need implement some methods only. That time I got some error. “Does not implement interface member”. How can I solve this problem? For example:-

public interface IComplianceRepository
    {
        IList<ComplianceModel> LoadComplianceModel(Guid userId);
        bool CreateCompliance(ComplianceModel complianceModel);
        IList<ComplianceType> LoadComplianceType();
        IList<ComplianceStatu> LoadComplianceStatus();
        IList<UserDetails> LoadUsersBySchoolId(int schoolId);
        Compliance GetComplianceByComplianceId(int complianceId);
        bool UpdateCompliance(ComplianceModel complianceModel);
        UserProfile GetUserProfileDetails(Guid userId);
        FinancialCompliance GetFinancialComplianceByComplianceId(int ComplianceId);
        void GetComplianceModelByComplianceId(ComplianceModel complianceModel, int complianceId);
    }

Many more developers used the above interface and implement the all method. But I don’t want implement the following methods

    IList<ComplianceModel> LoadComplianceModel(Guid userId);
    bool CreateCompliance(ComplianceModel complianceModel);

How can I solve this problem?

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1  
Make two separate interfaces? An interface is a contract, what should happen if you try and use a class that implements the interface but fails to provide implementations for 2 methods, and someone tries to call it? –  Matthew Apr 17 '13 at 13:31
    
If it's difficult to change the current interface and you don't need to implement those methods, seems like you just need to implement them and just throw a not implemented exception or return a null. –  Dennis Rongo Apr 17 '13 at 13:35
    
ComplianceStatu - using entity framework? :-P Anyway if you don't have to implement the entire interface to accomplish your goal, the interface is too broad. Split it up in multiple interfaces so each only contains methods that fit its description. The alternative is to do implement the methods, but throw an NotImplementedException from there... –  CodeCaster Apr 17 '13 at 13:36
    
@Dennis Rongo i thing ur idea is not good practice –  Gayatri Gaya Apr 17 '13 at 13:39
1  
This is an ideal scenario for Interface segregation. Please refer this design principle here (oodesign.com/interface-segregation-principle.html) You are require to segregate the contracts, don't put all eggs in one basket. –  RockWorld Apr 17 '13 at 13:48
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6 Answers

You can't. The only reason of an Interface to exist is so that the whole contract must be implemented in the classes that implement it.

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2  
That said, when you are sure some methods are not called, the common way to handle that is implementing those methods and throwing a NotImplementedException on them, however, it's bad practice to let those methods in your class on production code (you clearly are NOT implementing that interface in your class, so the correct interfaces should be split, or have them inherited from less complex ones) –  Jcl Apr 17 '13 at 13:34
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If you cannot or don't want to change the interface, you should implement those methods and throw a NotSupportedException. I recommend using explicit interface inheritance for this, so the dummy methods don't appear on the class.

void IList<ComplianceModel> IComplianceRepository.LoadComplianceModel(Guid userId)
{
    throw new NotSupportedException();
}

As an example in the BCL you can look at ReadOnlyCollection.ICollection.Add Method. It's an explicit interface implementation and it throws NotSupportedException. It's also an example for bad design, demonstrating the lack of an IReadOnlyList<T> interface in .net 4.0.


The real solution is refactoring your code. Have smaller interfaces which you implement completely. Take a look at the Interface segregation principle:

The interface-segregation principle (ISP) states that no client should be forced to depend on methods it does not use. ISP splits interfaces which are very large into smaller and more specific ones so that clients will only have to know about the methods that are of interest to them.

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Just to be pedantic, even if you throw a NotSupportedException you're still implementing the method. It's not doing anything useful, but it does have an implementation. There is no way to not implement the method at all. –  Servy Apr 17 '13 at 13:43
    
@Servy hm? How does that contradict my answer? –  CodesInChaos Apr 17 '13 at 13:46
    
It seems it doesn't. I though you had a "or throw a NotSupportedException" rather than an "and". –  Servy Apr 17 '13 at 13:50
    
While there should in retrospect certainly have been a covariant IReadableList<out T> and IDataSink<in T> [whose Feed method would translate to List.Add), the approach of including methods which may not be applicable to every instance, along with queries that will indicate which such methods are usable on each instance, can sometimes be a good one. For example, if IEnumerable had included an EaseOfCounting property [returning a flags enum] along with a Count property, there would have been no need to try casting an enumerable to ICollection to get a count. –  supercat Apr 17 '13 at 15:17
    
The biggest problem with IList<T> from that regard is that there aren't nearly enough queries to indicate what a given instance can do. For example, given IList<Car> myList; Car myCar1,myCar2;, even if myList.Count is 10, the only way to find out whether myList[0] = myCar1; will succeed is to try it and see if it throws an exception [and even if that first assignment does succeed, myList[1] = myCar2; may still throw an exception]. –  supercat Apr 17 '13 at 15:22
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Create two interface, parent and child. Parent will have exactly what you want, and child will have others.

public interface Parent {
    // parent methods here
}

public interface Child : Parent{
    // child methods here
}
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If a class implements an interface, it has to implement all of the functionality on that interface. An interface is a contract of functionality, so anything which claims to satisfy that contract must actually do so. Now, you don't have to meaningfully implement everything in that contract. The standard way to do this for a method you know you're not going to use, for example, would be this:

public void SomeMethodIKnowIWontUse()
{
    throw new NotSupportedException();
}

So if that method is ever actually used then it will throw an exception. (This would be an indication that you were wrong when you thought it wouldn't be used, and you should implement it.)

Keep in mind that this can quickly lead to a "code smell." If you have a lot of object members which don't need to be implemented then clearly the design is wrong...

Another possibility here is that the interface is incorrectly designed. Perhaps it's trying to be too many things to too many people? This could be a violation of the Single Responsibility Principle. For example, take this interface:

public interface CatchAll
{
    void FunctionForOneResponsibility();
    void FunctionForCompletelyDifferentResponsibility();
}

Using terribly contrived names, it's clear that this interface has too many responsibilities. It should be this instead:

public interface OneResponsibilitySatisfier
{
    void FunctionForThisResponsibility();
}

public interface AnotherResponsibilitySatisfier
{
    void FunctionForThisOtherResponsibility();
}

There's no rule that says you need to have few interfaces, or that an interface needs to have many members. Each one should provide a contract of meaningful functionality for its responsibility and nothing more. If by coincidence you have one class which would be used to satisfy both responsibilities, it can implement both interfaces:

public class CrossCuttingObject : OneResponsibilitySatisfier, AnotherResponsibilitySatisfier
{
    public void FunctionForThisResponsibility() { }
    public void FunctionForThisOtherResponsibility() { }
}
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You mixed up NotSupportedException and NotImplementedException –  CodesInChaos Apr 17 '13 at 13:41
    
@CodesInChaos: Potentially, I guess it depends on the conceptual context of the type. Is it not supported because that implementation doesn't do that piece of functionality? (In which case I question the design of the interface.) Or is it not implemented because that implementation hasn't had a need to build it yet? Either way, I'll update the answer. –  David Apr 17 '13 at 13:44
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Interfaces exist as a contract between implementers and users of the interface. The users/consumers require that all the methods be implemented. First, ask yourself if your implementation without these methods is still useful. If so, ask yourself if you need to inherit from this interface at all.

If after this reflection, you still have valid reasons to implement this interface without implementing all the methods, you can create stub methods:

IList<ComplianceModel> LoadComplianceModel(Guid userId)
{
   throw NotSupportedException();
}

or, more dangerously, but possibly less disruptively:

IList<ComplianceModel> LoadComplianceModel(Guid userId)
{
   return null;
}
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1  
Should be NotSupportedException not NotImplementedException. NotSupported means that it's deliberately not supported. NotImplemented means that you didn't write the code yet. It's essentially a ToDo item. –  CodesInChaos Apr 17 '13 at 13:39
    
Thanks, edited. –  Kohanz Apr 17 '13 at 13:44
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This is an ideal scenario for Interface segregation. Please refer this design principle here (oodesign.com/interface-segregation-principle.html) You are require to segregate the contracts, don't put all eggs in one basket.

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