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I am writing a JSON interface/library to work with Bugzilla's webservice.

Is this possible using an annotation or something? Or am I to write a custom deserializer for every instance like this?

I've tried doing some research, and found some information about a Value Instantiator or using constructors, but isn't using constructors anti-bean like? I've found documentation to be sparse or hard to understand with the newer features.

Example:

public class Bug{
  // Bug info, strings, ints, yadda yadda.
 private User creator;   // creator of the bug, json is like   {"creator":"blahblah@email.com"}
}

public class User{
 private String username;
}
//insert setter/getter.

The reason I am using a pojo for One field is because this User class is extended by another that has more fields. While I can implement a constructor to achieve this effect, doing so means I have to implement the same constructor for all other subclasses. I feel like there is something similar to @JsonValue but for setting (I tried JsonCreator on my setter but still got the same error as I have been getting below).

"Can not instantiate value of type [simple type, class User], from String value; no single-String constructor/factory method"

Thanks.

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Could you post code of your RESTful request? –  Paulino III Apr 17 '13 at 14:12
    
Had misunderstood your question. Have corrected the answer and it works. –  Niraj Nawanit Apr 17 '13 at 14:13

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Use @JsonCreator for deserializing and use @JsonValue for Serializing. Have tested the code. Please make sure that getJsonString() is public method.

For example:

public class User{
    private String username;

    @JsonValue
    public String getJsonString() {
         return username;
    }

    @JsonCreator
    private static User parseJson(String jsonStr) {
        User u = new User();
        u.username = jsonStr;
        return u;
    }

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        User u = new User();
        u.userName = "Niraj";

        ObjectMapper m = new ObjectMapper();
        String jsonString = m.writeValueAsString(u);
        User u1 = m.readValue(jsonString, User.class);
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
I put the @JsonProperty above the username field and I am still getting this error, " Can not instantiate value of type [simple type, User] from String value; no single-String constructor/factory method" –  Zerkz Apr 17 '13 at 13:53
    
While this works, this is not quite what I was looking for. I found out that by putting in a constructor (that wasn't empty) I was able to get the same effect as this. However my end goal was to do this without having to make a constructor or Json creator method (which is basically doing what a constructor would anyways). I will give you an upvote and if no one else can come up with a better solution, will give you the answer as your solution does work, but is not desirable. –  Zerkz Apr 17 '13 at 14:52

You don't need to use a @JsonCreator or @JsonValue or a construtor, Jackson will work OTTB with javabean methods: Try this instead:

public class User{
    private String username;

    public void setUsername(String username) {
        this.username = username;
    }

    public String getUsername() {
        return username;
    }

    public static void main(String[] args) throws Exception {
        User u = new User();
        u.setUsername("name");

        ObjectMapper m = new ObjectMapper();
        String userString = m.writeValueAsString(u);
        System.out.println(userString);
        User u1 = m.readValue(userString, User.class);
        System.out.println(u1.getUsername());
    }
}
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