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I am practising user input handling. My goal is to have the user enter a line of integers separated by space (" "), read them as integers, store them and work on them later. I stumbled upon an interesting problem (Atleast in my oppinion) the way I am doing it, it seems that it is always not reading the last digit which was entered by the user. I will post the entire program here (since there are some extra libreries that are included). I have left some comments in the program

#include <iostream>
#include <string>
#include <vector>
#include <stdlib.h>

using namespace std;

int main()
{
    //this vector will store the integers
    vector<int> a;
    // this will store the user input
    string inp;
    getline(cin, inp);
    // this string will temporarily store the digits
    string tmp;
    //be sure that the reading part is okay
    cout << inp << endl;
     //until you meet something different than a digit, read char by char and add to string
     for(int i = 0; i < inp.length(); i++)
    {
        if(isdigit(inp[i]))
        {
            tmp +=inp[i];
        }
        else
        {
            // when it is not a character, turn to integer, empty string
            int value = atoi(tmp.c_str());
            a.push_back(value);
            tmp = "";
        }
    }
    // paste the entire vector of integers
    for(int i = 0; i < a.size(); i++)
    {
        cout << a[i] << endl;
    }
    return 0;
}
share|improve this question
    
For some example input, what is your expected output, and what do you actually see? –  BoBTFish Apr 17 '13 at 13:43
    
if I input "25 30 46" I will get 25 and 30 in the vector, however the string will contain "25 30 46" –  Bloodcount Apr 17 '13 at 13:44
    
Ahh, see I thought you meant just a missing digit. –  BoBTFish Apr 17 '13 at 13:45
    
I expect that there is some error in the logic, since I originally wrote this with Qt's classes (QString, QVector, ect..) and I reworked it into simple c++ before posting here -> still had the same problem. –  Bloodcount Apr 17 '13 at 13:46
1  
As well as the current need for an extra space or post-loop processing of tmp, you have the problem that consecutive spaces will push 0 values into the vector - I assume you don't actually want that. An easy way to do this in C++ is to put the line into an istringstream then loop while (iss > myint). If you really want to stick to your current code style, then you can test tmp is not empty before using atoi on it. –  Tony D Apr 17 '13 at 13:50

9 Answers 9

up vote 3 down vote accepted

If the very end of the line is a digit, you don't hit the else on the last iteration, and that last number never gets pushed into the vector. The simplest solution would be to replicate the non-digit logic after the loop:

 if (!tmp.empty()) // If tmp has content, we need to put it in the vector.
 {
        int value = atoi(tmp.c_str());
        a.push_back(value);
        tmp = "";
 }

Although I'm sure you can think of a nicer way of structuring it.

Here's a version I came up with using std::stringstream, that also avoids atoi:

int main()
{
    std::vector<int> ints;
    std::string line;
    std::getline (std::cin, line);
    std::cout << "Read \"" << line << "\"\n";
    std::stringstream ss(line);

    int remaining = line.size();
    while (remaining)
    {
        if(std::isdigit(ss.peek())) // Read straight into an int
        {
            int tmp;
            ss >> tmp;
            ints.push_back(tmp);
        }
        else
        {
            ss.get(); // Eat useless characters
        }

        remaining = line.size()-ss.tellg();
    }

    for (auto i : ints)
        std::cout << i << '\n';

    return 0;
}

Running:

$ ./a.out <<< "12 34 56"
Read "12 34 56"
12
34
56

Note, this is specifically made to work with any old gibberish between the numbers:

$ ./a.out <<< "12-abc34-56"
Read "12-abc34-56"
12
34
56

If there will only be whitespace, this is even easier, as reading ints from a stringstream will ignore that automatically. In which case you just need:

int tmp;
while (ss >> tmp)
{
    ints.push_back(tmp);
}
share|improve this answer
    
That is correct. A solution is to simply add a ' ' mechanically at the end of the line before adding it. I will mark this as an answer when the timer let's me. Thank you! –  Bloodcount Apr 17 '13 at 13:48

Replace this line

for(int i = 0; i <inp.length(); i++)

by

for(int i = 0; i <= inp.length(); i++)

DEMO IDEONE

The problem with your code is: In example 25 30 46 whenever i=7, tmp=46. You are not pushing 46 in vector as inp[8] is a newline character, so your for loop terminates after i become 7.

Please Note: i <= inp.length() runs perfectly in most of the compilers as \0 is used/treated as sentinel.However, there are few compilers(like Microsoft Visual C++) that may show Assertion error: string subscript out of range.

share|improve this answer
1  
Hmm +1, an interesting trick, never considered using the ending '\0' as a sentinel. and it's also perfectly conforming. But it could be a good idea to provide a comment in the code. –  unkulunkulu Apr 17 '13 at 13:56
    
@unkulunkulu: it's conforming in C++11, however in C++03 I doubt it was legal (there was no guarantee the string was nul-terminated). To be fully conforming, you could use the subscript on the result of the c_str call though. –  Matthieu M. Apr 17 '13 at 14:23
    
@MatthieuM., I haven't found it in the drafts (I navigate there pretty badly), but the information I found elsewhere (cppreference) implies that s[s.size()] == '\0' is guaranteed. It doesn't guarantee that &s[0] or s.data() is null-terminated. –  unkulunkulu Apr 17 '13 at 14:36
    
@MatthieuM., ok so according to n1577, s[s.size()] == '\0' for const version of operator [], otherwise it's undefined. –  unkulunkulu Apr 17 '13 at 14:54
    
@unkulunkulu: in C++11 (§21.4.5 basic_string element access), s[s.size()] is guaranteed to be '\0' and should not be assigned to, it did not be allocated contiguously to the rest of the data either but then later in §21.4.7.1 basic_string accessors it is said that c_str and data should return a range indexable by [0, size()] in constant time...; I seem to recall, though, that in C++03 only c_str was guaranteed to be nul-terminated, and I don't know if there was the special caveat for [] (which at does not have, by the way... damned!) –  Matthieu M. Apr 17 '13 at 14:59

Your program need a string which is ended with a non-digit character to work correctly. Try this string "1 12 14587 15 " because in your algorithm when your forgot the last space, your program store the number into the tmp string but don't save it into the vector. To correct that you need to add a last push_back just after your first loop.

share|improve this answer

You update a with new value only when when non digit is found. Thus if you have string ending with digits, tmp will contain digital string but you will never get to else that should perform push_back. You may fix this by adding following code after for loop

if(!tmp.empty()){
    // when it is not a character, turn to integer, empty string
    int value = atoi(tmp.c_str());
    a.push_back(value);
    tmp = "";
}
share|improve this answer

Before starting the loop, add a space to the string to be sure to push the last number: inp.push_back(' ')

share|improve this answer

Your loop is finished after last digit is read, so the last digit is never turned to integer. Just add some code after original for loop.

for(int i = 0; i < inp.length(); i++)
{
    /* ...... */
}
// add this to read the last digit
if(tmp.length() > 0){
    int value = atoi(tmp.c_str());
    a.push_back(value);
    tmp = "";
}
share|improve this answer

You never push back your last value. For instance, consider this input

40 36

Then while you are reading, you push back at the first space. But you never push 36 since there are no more characters.

After the end of your for() loop you can try this:

if(!tmp.empty()) {
  a.push_back(tmp);
}
share|improve this answer

When the last digit of the last number is stored in tmp, after that the loop ends because you have read the last character of the entire string. When the loop ends tmp still contains the last number.

1) You can convert and add the last number to vector after the loop. The last number still available in tmp.

2) Or you can explicitly add non-digit character in the end of the string before the loop.

share|improve this answer

you ommit input. change your code to reflrct this:

   //this vector will store the integers
    vector<int> a;
    // this will store the user input
    string inp;
    getline(cin, inp);
    // this string will temporarily store the digits
    string tmp;
    //be sure that the reading part is okay
    cout << inp << endl;
     //until you meet something different than a digit, read char by char and add to string
     for(int i = 0; i < inp.length(); i++)
    {
        if(isdigit(inp[i]))
        {
            tmp =inp[i];
            int value = atoi(tmp.c_str());
            a.push_back(value);
        }
        else
        {
            tmp = "";
        }
    }
    // paste the entire vector of integers
    for(int i = 0; i < a.size(); i++)
    {
        cout << a[i] << endl;
    }
    return 0;

or replace in loop: for(int i = 0; i <inp.length(); i++)

by

for(int i = 0; i <= inp.length(); i++)
share|improve this answer

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