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I do have one question: Why this method does not change Integer value to 3?

public class SomeClass { private Integer value = 1;

public Integer getValue() {
    return value;
}

public void changeVal(Integer value) {
    value = new Integer(3);
}

public static void main(String args[]) {
    Integer a = new Integer(2);
    SomeClass c = new SomeClass();
    c.changeVal(a);
    System.out.print(a);
}}
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2  
This is a question of pass by reference vs pass by value I think. –  Will Apr 17 '13 at 13:55
    
value inside changeVal() is a /copy/ of a, not a reference to it –  SpacedMonkey Apr 17 '13 at 13:55
    
@SpacedMonkey It's a copy of the reference to a. –  Sotirios Delimanolis Apr 17 '13 at 14:03
    
@SotiriosDelimanolis: well a is a reference variable, so yes, it is a copy of a, a reference –  newacct Apr 18 '13 at 1:07

4 Answers 4

up vote 24 down vote accepted

An illustration will probably help.

The Birth of the Variable Named "a"

    Integer a = new Integer(2);

The line above results into this:

enter image description here

The Birth of the Variable Named "value"

When you call this method: c.changeVal(a);, you know it goes to this line:

public void changeVal(Integer value) {

The value variable is being declared here - did you notice the familiar syntax: Integer value? By passing a to the method, you have given this variable the same memory address where a points to. So you have 2 variables pointing to the same object now.

enter image description here

2 Different Variables, Born in Different Places, Intertwined by Code

Whatever you do to the variable value inside changeVal - has no effect to the relationship of variable a to the Integer object.

This line: value = new Integer(3); simply results into this:

enter image description here

In fact, even if we set value to null, a remains unscathed:

public void changeVal(Integer value) {
    value = null;
}

enter image description here

The Variable "a" has been the Same All Along

You never touched the variable a. This is exactly why when you print it out later, it's still 2.

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Love this answer, greatly helped –  iOS Padawan Jan 20 '14 at 7:42
    
+1 for the entertainment @Jops –  adhg Oct 28 '14 at 1:20

Make changeVal return an integer.

public IntegerchangeVal(Integer value) {
    this.value = new Integer(3);
return this.value;
}

and

a= c.changeVal(a);
System.out.print(a);
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Simple solution is to make a class that wraps your value

public class Box<T> {
    private T value;

    public Box() {
    }

    public Box(T value) {
        this.value = value;
    }

    public T getValue() {
        return value;
    }

    public void setValue(T value) {
        this.value = value;
    }
}

you can use it after then and change it anywhere and your changes would be affect the same value

Box<Integer> value = new Box<Integer>(10);
value.setValue(20);
int i = value.getValue(); // should return 20
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At the end you print the value of a rather than c.getValue(). a is not changed, only the value in c.

Also changeVal should be:

public void changeVal(Integer value) {
    this.value = new Integer(3);
}

In the changeVal method you provided the value argument is a local variable and is different from the instance variable of the same name -- this is referred to as shadowing. You are setting the local variable value to a new value of new Integer(3) which is then discarded when the method returns because it is only a local variable.

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