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I have a shell program written in C, and when I try to run the command "ls |" (Just ls and a pipe with nothing after it), my program loops forever. You can ignore the modePtr... What this parser does is take a string of characters from user input, so it is parsing the command "ls |" I'm guessing the issue is with the fact there isn't a "case" that an empty pipe command will fall into, causing an infinite loop? Any suggestions?

int parse(char *inputString, char *cmdArgv[], char **supplementPtr, int *modePtr)
{
int cmdArgc = 0, terminate = 0;
char *srcPtr = inputString;
//printf("parse fun%sends", inputString);
while(*srcPtr != '\0' && terminate == 0)
{
    *cmdArgv = srcPtr;
    cmdArgc++;
    //printf("parse fun2%sends", *cmdArgv);
    while(*srcPtr != ' ' && *srcPtr != '\t' && *srcPtr != '\0' && *srcPtr != '\n' && terminate == 0)
    {
        // Handles redirection/pipes
        switch(*srcPtr)
        {
            // Background mode
            case '&':
                *modePtr = BACKGROUND;
                break;
            // Output mode
            case '>':
                *modePtr = OUTPUT_REDIRECTION;
                *cmdArgv = '\0';
                srcPtr++;
                if(*srcPtr == '>')
                {
                    *modePtr = OUTPUT_APP;
                    srcPtr++;
                }
                while(*srcPtr == ' ' || *srcPtr == '\t' || *srcPtr == '\0')
                    srcPtr++;
                *supplementPtr = srcPtr;
                chop(*supplementPtr);
                terminate = 1;
                break;
            // Input mode
            case '<':
                *modePtr = INPUT_REDIRECTION;
                *cmdArgv = '\0';
                srcPtr++;
                while(*srcPtr == ' ' || *srcPtr == '\t' || *srcPtr == '\0')
                    srcPtr++;
                *supplementPtr = srcPtr;
                chop(*supplementPtr);
                terminate = 1;
                break;
            // Pipe mode
            case '|':
                *modePtr = PIPELINE;
                *cmdArgv = '\0';
                srcPtr++;
                while(*srcPtr == ' ' || *srcPtr == '\t' || *srcPtr == '\0')
                    srcPtr++;
                *supplementPtr = srcPtr;
                //chop(*supplementPtr);
                terminate = 1;
                break;
        }
        srcPtr++;
    }
    // Process commands when these occur
    while((*srcPtr == ' ' || *srcPtr == '\t' || *srcPtr == '\n') && terminate == 0)
    {
        *srcPtr = '\0';
        srcPtr++;
    }
    cmdArgv++;
}
/*srcPtr++;
*srcPtr = '\0';
destPtr--;*/
*cmdArgv = '\0';
return cmdArgc;
}
share|improve this question
    
I know it is nonsense, but how can I handle that with this parser? –  James Brown Apr 17 '13 at 14:35

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You may have overcomplicated the problem. If you want a program to read a list items piped to it...

#define MAXLINELEN 1000
#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>

int main (int argc, char *argv[]) {

    char line[MAXLINELEN];
    FILE *fpin;

    fpin=stdin;

    while(fgets(line,MAXLINELEN,fpin)!=NULL) printf("%s",line);

}

... you can then parse the items on each line using strtok(), or if you use "ls -1", each list item is on a unique line anyway.

Hope this helps.

share|improve this answer

If you try ls | in an ordinary shell, it will prompt you for the rest of the pipeline (another command) before trying to launch anything. A pipe with no command to read the output is nonsense.

This idiom (repeated several times in the code) is broken:

srcPtr++;
while (*srcPtr == ' ' || *srcPtr == '\t' || *srcPtr == '\0')
    srcPtr++;

You can't afford to skip over the null '\0' at the end of the string! You immediately fall into 'undefined behaviour'. You need to review the loop logic, perhaps to:

srcPtr++;
while (*srcPtr == ' ' || *srcPtr == '\t')
    srcPtr++;
if (*srcPtr == '\0')
    ...no more data in string...
share|improve this answer
    
I tried what you suggested, would it be better to have the if statement inside the while loop? It isn't working as you suggested above. –  James Brown Apr 17 '13 at 14:43
    
The if would never be true in the body of the loop because the only values for *srcPtr in the loop are blank and tab. You will have to think about early termination semantics; what happens when there is no more input to read but more input is required. –  Jonathan Leffler Apr 17 '13 at 15:33
    
You might notice that if someone types ls >, your code has problems; what is the name of the file? At the moment, the same loop as above skips past the end of string and uses who knows what as the name of the file. –  Jonathan Leffler Apr 17 '13 at 15:46

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