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Every blog post I've read tells you how to consume an async method in C# 5, but for some odd reason never explain how to build your own async methods to consume. So I have this code right now that consumes my method.

private async void button1_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
{
    var now = await CountToAsync(1000);
    label1.Text = now.ToString();
}

And I wrote this method that is CountToAsync:

private Task<DateTime> CountToAsync(int num = 1000)
{
    return Task.Factory.StartNew(() =>
    {
        for (int i = 0; i < num; i++)
        {
            Console.WriteLine("#{0}", i);
        }
    }).ContinueWith(x => DateTime.Now);
}

Is this, the use of Task.Factory, the best way to write an async method, or should I write this another way?

share|improve this question
    
Since we don't know what you're doing, how should we know what the best way to do it is? The way you'd do an asynchronous computation of a fractal image is very different than the way you'd do an asynchronous download of a file. –  Eric Lippert Apr 17 '13 at 15:29
2  
I'm asking a general question about how to structure a method. I just want to know where to start in turning my already synchronous methods into asynchronous ones. –  Khalid Abuhakmeh Apr 17 '13 at 15:30
    
OK, so what does a typical synchronous method do, and why do you want to make it asynchronous? –  Eric Lippert Apr 17 '13 at 15:32
    
Let's say I have to batch process a bunch of files and return a result object. –  Khalid Abuhakmeh Apr 17 '13 at 15:36
1  
OK, so: (1) what is the high-latency operation: obtaining the files -- because the network could be slow, or whatever -- or doing the processing -- because it is CPU intensive, say. And (2) you still haven't said why you want it to be asynchronous in the first place. Is there a UI thread that you want to not block, or what? –  Eric Lippert Apr 17 '13 at 15:56

3 Answers 3

up vote 58 down vote accepted

I don't recommend StartNew unless you need that level of complexity.

If your async method is dependent on other async methods, the easiest approach is to use the async keyword:

private static async Task<DateTime> CountToAsync(int num = 10)
{
  for (int i = 0; i < num; i++)
  {
    await Task.Delay(TimeSpan.FromSeconds(1));
  }

  return DateTime.Now;
}

If your async method is doing CPU work, you should use Task.Run:

private static async Task<DateTime> CountToAsync(int num = 10)
{
  await Task.Run(() => ...);
  return DateTime.Now;
}

You may find my async/await intro helpful.

share|improve this answer
2  
@Stephen: "If your async method is dependanton other async methods" - ok, but what if that is not the case. What if were trying to wrap some code that calls BeginInvoke with some callback code? –  Ricibob Aug 27 '13 at 10:46
    
@Ricibob: You should use TaskFactory.FromAsync to wrap BeginInvoke. Not sure what you mean about "callback code"; feel free to post your own question with code. –  Stephen Cleary Aug 27 '13 at 12:05
    
@Stephen: Thanks - yes TaskFactory.FromAsync is what I was looking for. –  Ricibob Aug 28 '13 at 12:48

Just add a couple of words to your code - "async" and "await":

private async Task<DateTime> CountToAsync(int num = 1000)
{
    return await Task.Factory.StartNew(() =>
    {
        for (int i = 0; i < num; i++)
        {
            Console.WriteLine("#{0}", i);
        }
    }).ContinueWith(x => DateTime.Now);
}
share|improve this answer
    
Your use of await added nothing to the code that wasn't there before, unlike the accepted answer that actually leverages await to simplify the code. Your solution adds complexity, rather than removing it. –  Servy Nov 26 '13 at 18:32
    
Please explain why you would add this to the code. I can't see any benefit. –  Campl3r Nov 26 '13 at 18:48
private async void button1_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
{
    var now = await CountToAsync(1000);
    label1.Text = now.ToString();
}


private Task<DateTime> CountToAsync(int num = 1000)
{
        Task<DateTime> t1 = new Task<DateTime>(() =>
        {
            for (int i = 0; i < num; i++)
            {
                Console.WriteLine("#{0}", i);
            }
            return DateTime.Now;
        });

        t1.Start();
        return t1;
 }

Why to use Task.Factory.StartNew() you can create a new Task start it and return that task

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