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Hi guy I have a little problem I have read many post similar than this but couldn't find the complete answer..I need to check if today is a public holiday date or not so. I have a "public-holiday-dates.txt" file with public holiday dates like:(mmddyyyy)

01012013

07012013

12252013

And I have a variable $today_date_is which has today date example: 04172013 and I need to search for this value in the .txt file and return 1 if found (this would be the case that today is a public holiday date) or return 0 if not found (today it´s a working day)

How could I do this? Should I open file and load all info to a variable and split lines ? Or could I search within the file? How could I return the value 0 or 1.. Thanks in advance..

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up vote 2 down vote accepted

The game plan is to open the file, read the contents, then treat that contents as a list. You can then use the lsearch (list search) command, which returns -1 if the value is not found:

proc is_holiday {the_date} {
    set infile [open public-holiday-dates.txt]
    set holidays [read $infile]
    close $infile

    if {[lsearch $holidays $the_date] == -1} {
        return 0
    } else {
        return 1
    }
}

Using it

You can call this procedure by:

if {[is_holiday $today_date_is]} {
    puts "Is a holiday"
} else {
    puts "Is not a holiday"
}

Discussion

  • The first three lines of the procedure is_holiday deal with opening the holiday file, read the contents, and close -- straight forward, but I'll talk more about the file later.
  • The next block, the if command tests the search result: -1 means not found, so the procedure returns 0. It returns 1 otherwise--again, this is very straight forward.
  • I can combine the whole if block into one statement, but I chose not to for the sake of readability, especially for beginners. I am sure that block is more readable than:

    return [expr {[lsearch $holidays $the_date] != -1}]
    
  • This procedure opens/read/close the holiday file every time it is called. If you call it often (for example, several thousand times), then you might want to restructure the code to read it only once to optimize for speed.
  • Back to the file name, the procedure currently hard-coded (assume) the file name to be public-holiday-dates.txt, which is not a good practice. What if the file name changed? What if you want to search in a different file? One way to deal with this issue is to allow the caller to optionally specify a file name.

    proc is_holiday {the_date {holiday_filename public-holiday-dates.txt}} {
        set infile [open $holiday_filename]
        set holidays [read $infile]
        close $infile
    
        if {[lsearch $holidays $the_date] == -1} {
            return 0
        } else {
            return 1
        }
    }
    

Now, if you want to specify a different calendar file:

 is_holiday $today_date_is other_calendar.txt
share|improve this answer

Since the size of the file public-holiday-dates.txt is probably not that large, I would read it in once, split the lines, and store the resulting list in a variable. You can do so as follows:

set fp [open "public-holiday-dates.txt" r]
set file_data [read $fp]
close $fp
set holidays [split $file_data "\n"]

Once you have all your holidays in a list, you can use lsearch (list search) to search the list for the given date. The one complication is that lsearch returns the index where the item is found or -1 if not found. So you'll need to convert that to your desired 0/1. You can do so as follows:

[expr [lsearch $holidays $today_date_is] > -1]
share|improve this answer
1  
I'd do [expr {$today_date_is in $holidays}] from Tcl 8.5 onwards. – Donal Fellows Apr 17 '13 at 15:58

Another alternative. You could use ::fileutil::grep

package require fileutil

set the_date [clock format [clock seconds] -format "%m%d%y"]

if { [::fileutil::grep (?i)$the_date public-holiday-dates.txt] !="" } {
return 1 
} else {
return 0
}
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