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I have this really quick question, im guessing is just staring at me but im not being able to see it. I had to count the number of occurrences of a certain name in an array. I did that using a loop as i was not allowed to use classes, hashmap etc. So i have a 93 names, for example Jake occurs 5 times, i want the out to be:

       Jack - 5

instead, my program displays

       Jack - 5
       Jack - 5
       Jack - 5
       Jack - 5
       Jack - 5

I just want it to be printed once, here is my loop for it:

for (int counter = 0; counter < name.length; counter++)
    {
        String n = (name[counter]);
        int count = 0;
        for (int i = 0; i < name.length; i++){
            if (name[i].equals(n))
                count++;
        }

        System.out.println(n + " - " + count);
    }

ideal output should be:

                  Jack - 5

i need to print asterisks as output, so i want it to say

                 Jack (5) ***** 

Each asterisk represents a occurrence, i know how to print them, and i have put it in my code but it displays

                ***** Jack(5) 

I was wondering how i could i fix that, any ideas?

share|improve this question
    
name [jack, jack, jack, jack, jack, james, etc], filled with names @SpAm –  roro Apr 17 '13 at 15:42
    
Sorry I deleted the comment, and expanded in an answer. –  MasNotsram Apr 17 '13 at 15:45
add comment

3 Answers

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Please check next code:

for (int counter = 0; counter < name.length; counter++)
    {
        String n = (name[counter]);
        int count = 0;
        boolean flag = true;
        for (int i = 0; i < counter; i++){
            if (name[i].equals(n)) {
               flag = false;
            }
        }
        if (flag) {
           for (int i = 0; i < name.length; i++){
               if (name[i].equals(n))
                   count++;
           }

           System.out.println(n + " - " + count);
        }
    }

Here you checked if selected name not yet in the array (from 0 to counter) than you count how many times it keeps in array and display information.

share|improve this answer
    
thanks for your help!! –  roro Apr 17 '13 at 16:14
    
Always welcome. If you need have problems with this code I can help. –  Petro Gordiyevich Apr 17 '13 at 16:17
    
As said in my other comment, String is just as much of a class as Arrays is. This answer is less efficient, as it involves three loops. –  MasNotsram Apr 18 '13 at 12:41
    
yeh, your answer makes more logical sense but if i tell my teacher i wrote that on my own, he'll just laugh at me, this answer is easy for me to explain and passable as my own, but in the future, definitely using yours @SpAm –  roro Apr 18 '13 at 13:10
1  
@Petro Gordiyevich I'm sorry if my comment came across as a criticism of your code, that was not my intention. On the contrary, it's nice code, and as I said in my last comment, it's the most efficient way you could do it with three loops. I was simply stating for future viewers of the thread, that the most efficient way would be using the sort method on the Array class as Achintya Jha suggested (which I then wrote code to demonstrate). I did not mean to imply that this was not appropriate code. –  MasNotsram Apr 22 '13 at 8:26
show 2 more comments

You're cycling through each name in the list and checking it each time. Consequently, you're checking the name Jack 5 times, so you get 5 outputs.

As for some reason you're not allowed to use HashMaps, this should solve it:

String name[] = new String[]{"jack", "jack", "jack", "james", "jack", "jack", "james"};
ArrayList<String> checkedNames = new ArrayList<String>();

for (int counter = 0; counter < name.length; counter++)
{
    String n = (name[counter]);
    if(!checkedNames.contains(n))
    {
        int count = 0;
        for (int i = 0; i < name.length; i++){
            if (name[i].equals(n))
                count++;
        }
        checkedNames.add(n);
        System.out.println(n + " - " + count);
    }

}

Edit: As you can't use ArrayLists but can sort the array:

    String name[] = new String[]{"jack", "jack", "jack", "jack", "jack", "james"};
    String lastName = "";

    Arrays.sort(name);

    for (int counter = 0; counter < name.length; counter++)
    {
        String n = (name[counter]);


        if(!lastName.equals(n))
        {
            int count = 0;
            for (int i = 0; i < name.length; i++){
                if (name[i].equals(n))
                    count++;
            }

            System.out.println(n + " - " + count);
        }
        lastName = n;
    }

Second edit:

Firstly, Arrays is a class built into Java, just as String is:

http://docs.oracle.com/javase/6/docs/api/java/util/Arrays.html http://docs.oracle.com/javase/1.5.0/docs/api/java/lang/String.html

Secondly, if you want it to print asterisks, then change the System.out.println line to this:

System.out.println(n + " (" + count + ")" + new String(new char[count]).replace("\0", "*"));
share|improve this answer
    
yeah sorry, forgot to mention, cant use ArrayList and also cant use classes –  roro Apr 17 '13 at 15:48
    
Haha, you can't use ArrayList?! What kind of assessment is this? 'How to write the least efficient java possible?'?! Not using HashMaps, ArrayLists, or Classes is ridiculous, as they are very basic setups in Java designed exactly for situations like this. –  MasNotsram Apr 17 '13 at 15:49
1  
@user2291452 You can sort the array or that is also restricted? –  Achintya Jha Apr 17 '13 at 15:52
    
yeah i know right, been stuck on this for like 3 days. if we could use classes, could have been done last year @SpAm –  roro Apr 17 '13 at 15:55
    
you can sort them, i have already done that @AchintyaJha –  roro Apr 17 '13 at 15:56
show 12 more comments

Will you try having a different array (lets say encouteredNames) which will store those names whose number of occurrence you've already counted? And then execute only the 'counting' loop only when you've determined that the name to be searched has not been searched previously (or it is still not stored in the encounteredNames array).

I'm sure there are better implementations than this, but for the meantime:

String[] names = {"Jack", "James", "Charles", "Jack", "Jack", "James"};
String[] encounteredNames = new String[names.length];
int encounteredNamesCount = 0;
for (int counter = 0; counter < names.length; counter++) {
  String name = (names[counter]);
  boolean nameAlreadyEncountered = false;
  for (int i = 0; i < encounteredNames.length && encounteredNames[i] != null; i++) {
    if (encounteredNames[i] == name) {
      nameAlreadyEncountered = true;
      break;
    }
  }
  if (!nameAlreadyEncountered) {
    encounteredNames[encounteredNamesCount++] = name;
    int count = 0;
    for (int i = 0; i < names.length; i++){
      if (names[i].equals(name)) {
        count++;
      }
    }
    System.out.println(name + " - " + count);
  }
}
share|improve this answer
    
how will i go about doing that? –  roro Apr 17 '13 at 15:59
    
Okay I'll include it in my answer, for a while :) –  Arnelle Balane Apr 17 '13 at 16:02
    
thank you for your help! i'll keep this in a safe place for the next time i need to create another Array! Thanks for all your help! much appreciated :) –  roro Apr 17 '13 at 16:13
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