Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.

I have the following C# code:

using System;
using System.Threading;

// Simple threading scenario:  Start a static method running
// on a second thread.
public class ThreadExample {
    // The ThreadProc method is called when the thread starts.
    // It loops ten times, writing to the console and yielding 
    // the rest of its time slice each time, and then ends.
    public static void ThreadProc() {
        for (int i = 0; i < 10; i++) {
            Console.WriteLine("ThreadProc: {0}", i);
            // Yield the rest of the time slice.
            Thread.Sleep(0);
        }
    }

    public static void Main() {
        Console.WriteLine("Main thread: Start a second thread.");
        // The constructor for the Thread class requires a ThreadStart 
        // delegate that represents the method to be executed on the 
        // thread.  C# simplifies the creation of this delegate.
        Thread t = new Thread(new ThreadStart(ThreadProc));

        // Start ThreadProc.  Note that on a uniprocessor, the new 
        // thread does not get any processor time until the main thread 
        // is preempted or yields.  Uncomment the Thread.Sleep that 
        // follows t.Start() to see the difference.
        t.Start();
        //Thread.Sleep(0);

        for (int i = 0; i < 4; i++) {
            Console.WriteLine("Main thread: Do some work.");
            Thread.Sleep(0);
        }

        Console.WriteLine("Main thread: Call Join(), to wait until ThreadProc ends.");
        t.Join();
        Console.WriteLine("Main thread: ThreadProc.Join has returned.  Press Enter to end program.");
        Console.ReadLine();
    }
}

It's a long time since I studied the thread to university, the only thing that I still remember is:

thread execution is pretty unpredictable and may vary based underlayng OS.

So the real question is: why I can't be sure not even about the first execution of ThreadProc? What happen when I execute t.Start()? Why ThreadProc: 0 isn't printed immediately after Main thread: Start a second thread in every execution?

share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

up vote 7 down vote accepted

Why I can't be sure not even about the first execution of ThreadProc?

Because this is nondeterministic neither by .NET nor Windows OS documentation (I suppose you are using Windows)

What happen when I execute t.Start()?

Thread will be scheduled by OS for execution. MSDN: "Causes a thread to be scheduled for execution."

Why ThreadProc: 0 isn't printed immediately after Main thread: Start a second thread in every execution?

Because there is some delay between Thread.Start() call and actual thread start

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.