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Just started trying my hand at python and need some pointers.

I am looking to generate a combination based on certain parameters.

Basically,

parm1 = ['X1','X2']
parm2 = ['Y1','Y2']

What I'd like to get from this is

['X1','Y1','X1','Y1']
['X1','Y1','X1','Y2']
['X1','Y1','X2','Y1']
['X1','Y1','X2','Y2']

I thought one could use a binary list (itertools.product("01", repeat=4)) and substitute each element ie.

0 0 0 0
0 0 0 1

Would represent

X1 Y1 X1 Y1
X1 Y1 X1 Y2

What is the optimal way of doing this?

EDIT: Let me try and add more information.

Colour = ['Black','White']
Type = ['Car','Bike']

So, I'm trying to format this into the following

                       ('Colour','Type','Colour','Type')
('0', '0', '0', '0')-->('Black','Car','Black','Car')
('0', '0', '0', '1')-->('Black','Car','Black','Bike')
('0', '0', '1', '0')-->('Black','Car','White','Car')
('0', '0', '1', '1')-->('Black','Car','White','Bike')
('0', '1', '0', '0')
('0', '1', '0', '1')
('0', '1', '1', '0')
('0', '1', '1', '1')
('1', '0', '0', '0')
('1', '0', '0', '1')
('1', '0', '1', '0')
('1', '0', '1', '1')
('1', '1', '0', '0')
('1', '1', '0', '1')
('1', '1', '1', '0')
('1', '1', '1', '1')-->('White','Bike','White','Bike')

I know this can be done with an if statement for each index of the list but is there an alternative method?

EDIT AGAIN:

I wrote this, but think there much be a much more elegant solution?

import itertools
q=[]
x=["","","",""]
q=list(itertools.product("01", repeat=4))
for p in q:
    if float(p[0]) == 0:
        x[0]= "Black"
    else:
        x[0] = "White"
    if float(p[1]) == 0:
        x[1]= "Car"
    else:
        x[1] = "Bike"
    if float(p[2]) == 0:
        x[2]= "Black"
    else:
        x[2] = "White"
    if float (p[3]) == 0:
        x[3] = "Car"
    else:
        x[3] = "Bike"
    print p
    print x
share|improve this question
1  
Is there rule for selection some combinations? –  perreal Apr 17 '13 at 15:56
3  
Can you explain a little better how you get from parm1 and parm2 to the output lists you're requesting? –  mgilson Apr 17 '13 at 16:00
2  
The four you've listed are given by list(itertools.product(parm1, parm2, parm1, parm2))[:4], but I don't know if you only listed the first four you wanted and simply didn't mention that you wanted more, or if those are the only four you want and I don't understand the selection rule. –  DSM Apr 17 '13 at 16:02
    
perhaps you'd like to give another example of inputs and outputs you require? –  Vorsprung Apr 17 '13 at 16:34
    
Added some more information, hope it's clear now. –  Ash Apr 17 '13 at 17:34

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Basically what you want is a flat version of this:

from itertools import product
nested = product(product(Colour, Type), repeat=2)
print list(nested)
# [(('Black', 'Car'), ('Black', 'Car')), 
#  (('Black', 'Car'), ('Black', 'Bike')),
#  ...
# ]

So here you go:

from itertools import product
nested = product(product(Colour, Type), repeat=2)

# flatten it by unpacking each element
print [(a,b,c,d) for ((a,b),(c,d)) in nested]

# alternative way to flatten the product
from itertools import chain
print [tuple(chain.from_iterable(x)) for x in nested]

To convert the (0,1) list you can use the numbers as indices:

from itertools import product

Colour = ['Black','White'] # so Color[0] == 'Black' 
Type = ['Car','Bike']

#make that list
nested = product((0,1), repeat=4) # use numbers not strings
print [(Colour[a], Type[b], Colour[c], Type[d]) for (a,b,c,d) in nested]
share|improve this answer
    
I might use [tuple(chain(*p)) for p in nested] or chain.from_iterable or something; seems a shame to use repeat to avoid hardcoding and then reintroduce it at the end. –  DSM Apr 17 '13 at 18:00
    
I'm getting a syntax error at nested = product(product(Colour, Type), repeat=2)) –  Ash Apr 17 '13 at 18:03
    
Silly me, figured it out, itertools.product –  Ash Apr 17 '13 at 18:09
    
@Ash: I had a extra ) in there, try again –  Jochen Ritzel Apr 17 '13 at 18:09
    
@JochenRitzel Yep! Understood it better now! :) I know this is the right solution, but to gain some know how, how does one map the 1s and 0s like I tried? –  Ash Apr 17 '13 at 18:18

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