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Simplified problem

Given

class Foo f where
    frobnicate :: f -> Float

how could I allow any instance of Foo in

 data Bar = Bar { <here> }

?

Actual problem

Given

-- Typically lightweight geometric objects, e.g. spheres
class Shape s where
    intersect :: (RealFrac t, Floating t, Ord t, Shape s)
              => Ray t -> s t -> Maybe (DifferentialGeometry t)

and

-- Primitives contain higher level informations, like material properties
class Primitive p where
    intersect :: (RealFrac t, Floating t, Ord t, Primitive p)
              => Ray t -> p t -> Maybe (Intersection t)

Note the only difference in the signatures of Primitive.intersect and Shape.intersect lies in the return type.

Now I would like to add a wrapper which basically transforms any Shape into a Primitive.

I would think it works roughly like this:

data ShapeWrapperPrimitive t = ShapeWrapperPrimitive {
                                  shape :: (Shape s) => s t
                               }

or in other words, I would like to add an arbitrary shape member, which is of the Shape class.

However, this gives me Illegal polymorphic or qualified type.

share|improve this question
3  
Why not data ShapeWrapperPrimitive s t = ... and instance (Shape s) => Primitive (ShapeWrapperPrimitive s) where ... instead? –  C. A. McCann Apr 17 '13 at 16:11
    
@C.A.McCann: Oh had you just written out the ... ... :) See my own answer. I am really used to bad error messages (C++), but Haskell adds a new dimension to it. Will one get used to it? –  phresnel Apr 17 '13 at 19:47
    
GHC's error messages tend to be terse but informative, once you learn to decipher what they mean (note that its suggested "solutions" are often ridiculous). So yeah, I guess that qualifies as "getting used to it". –  C. A. McCann Apr 17 '13 at 20:02

4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

I'm not sure if your simplified problem is really a simplification of the actual problem. The answer to the simplified problem is:

If the only thing you can do with an unknown type that is an instance of class Foo is to turn it into a Float, then you can just as well store the Float.

So you'd use

data Bar = Bar Float

However, if I understand your actual problem correctly, then you want to wrap a type that is an instance of class Shape and thereby turn it into an instance of class Primitive. For this, I'd define

newtype ShapeWrapperPrimitive s t = ShapeWrapperPrimitive (s t)

and then say

instance Shape s => Primitive (ShapeWrapperPrimitive s) where
  intersect = ... -- fill in definition here
share|improve this answer
    
Accepting, because even though newtype does not apply (I want to add more data to ShapeWrapperPrimitive) it was your syntax-non-error that uncovered my mistake :) –  phresnel Apr 17 '13 at 19:39

I can see two solutions to this kind of problems :

1) Use the language extension ExistentialQuantification. So you can write :

data Blah = forall a. Num a => Blah a

2) Move the constraint to your functions, like

data Blah a = Blah a

f :: (Num a) => Blah a -> a
f = undefined

or your instances :

instance (Num a) => Foo (Blah a) where
  -- ...
share|improve this answer

This isn't an answer to the question you asked, but it may be helpful. If you're creating a list with both Shapes and Primitives, then you need a wrapper type, as described by thoferon. But if you're not, then maybe you don't really need a wrapper type.

You said "Note the only difference in the signatures of Primitive.intersect and Shape.intersect lies in the return type." You can represent that relationship using type families, as shown below. This gives you a type family called Thing. The result type of intersect can be different for each type that is an instance of Thing.

{-# LANGUAGE TypeFamilies, TypeSynonymInstances #-}

class Thing t where
  type Result t
  intersect :: Ray t -> s t -> Maybe (Result t)

-- Made-up type definitions just to get things to compile
data Shape s t = Shape s t
data Primitive p t = Primitive p t
type Ray t = (Double, t)
type DifferentialGeometry t = [t]
type Intersection t = [t]

-- Typically lightweight geometric objects, e.g. spheres
instance Thing (Shape s t) where
  type Result (Shape s t) = DifferentialGeometry t
  intersect a b = undefined

-- Primitives contain higher level informations, like material properties
instance Thing (Primitive p t) where
  type Result (Primitive p t) = Intersection t
  intersect a b = undefined
share|improve this answer
    
Interesting, thank you. –  phresnel Apr 17 '13 at 19:45

Even though I accepted another answer, I'll post this for future visitors.


My problem was more or less a what could be considered a typo. At some point, I had

23:  data ShapeWrapperPrimitive s t = ShapeWrapperPrimitive s t
24:  
25:  instance (Shape s) => Primitive (ShapeWrapperPrimitive s) where
26:     intersect _ _ = Nothing

--- >> line 25: Expecting one more argument to `s'

which let me to a path of confusion and torment. Notice how it points me to line 25. The accepted answer uncovered my mistake: Instead of

data ShapeWrapperPrimitive s t = ShapeWrapperPrimitive s t

I was in need of

data ShapeWrapperPrimitive s t = ShapeWrapperPrimitive (s t)

The first would have added an s and a t as a members, whereas I really wanted an s t; adding the parens solved my problem.

share|improve this answer
    
FYI--looks like you forgot to actually mark the other answer accepted? –  C. A. McCann Apr 17 '13 at 20:16
    
@C.A.McCann: Whoops, indeed. Thanks for the reminder :) –  phresnel Apr 18 '13 at 10:17

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