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I wanted to check if my_number was in a certain range, including the higher Value.

In an IF Statement I'd simply use "x > 100 && x <= 500"

But what should I do in a Ruby case (switch)?

Using:

case my_number
when my_number <= 500
    puts "correct"
end

doesn't work.

Note:

The standard Range doesn't include the case if my_number is exactly 500, and I don't want to add the second "when", as I would have to write double Content

case my_number
# between 100 and 500
when 100..500
    puts "Correct, do something"
when 500
    puts "Correct, do something again"
end
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You are wrong. 100..500 does match 500. –  sawa Apr 17 '13 at 16:27
    
sawa is right. Thanks for the help guys! –  TheChamp Apr 17 '13 at 16:38

3 Answers 3

up vote 5 down vote accepted

It should just work like you said. The below case construct includes the value 500.

case my_number
# between 100 and 500
when 100..500
    puts "Correct, do something"
end

So:

case 500
  when 100..500
    puts "Yep"
end

will return Yep

Or would you like to perform a separate action if the value is exactly 500?

share|improve this answer
    
It did answer my question, and you're absolutely right, still a noob I guess :) –  TheChamp Apr 17 '13 at 16:33
    
No worries, glad I could confirm your own answer ;) –  Christian-G Apr 17 '13 at 16:34
3  
Just for completeness sake: 1..500 includes 500, whereas 1...500 does not include 500. Ranges constructed using .. run from the beginning to the end inclusively. Those created using ... exclude the end value –  Christian-G Apr 17 '13 at 16:35
    
thanks yossarian! Appreciate it! –  TheChamp Apr 17 '13 at 16:36
    
@yossarian, is it possible to use ranges in a case statement as you indicate above with DATE ranges? I want to test if today's date is in certain ranges, and depending on what date range it is in, assign a value to current_week. Thanks –  jackerman09 Oct 11 '13 at 2:28
when -Float::INFINITY..0

Would do the trick :)

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You could just do:

(1..500).include? x

which is also aliased as member?.

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