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All:

I have two files:

main.cpp

#include <iostream>

using namespace std;

class A;

int main(){
    A a;
    a.disp();

    return 0;
}

and A.cpp

#include <iostream>
using namespace std;

class A{

    public:
    A(){}
    void disp(){ cout<<"this is A disp()"<<endl;}
};

I wonder why when I compile this two files, it told me that:

main.cpp: In function ‘int main()’: main.cpp:8:4: error: aggregate ‘A a’ has incomplete type and cannot be defined

I think it because I do not understand how to use forward declaration, so can someone tell me how to do this?

BTW, I know the header file way to do this, but I just want to figure out in this forward declare way.

best,

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3  
You cannot use a forward declaration here. –  juanchopanza Apr 17 '13 at 16:52
    
@juanchopanza can you give me some more detail? –  Kuan Apr 17 '13 at 16:53
    
Short of writing what you would write in the header in the source file there is little you can do. The compiler just doesn't know enough about the class to do anything with it other than allocate a pointer to it. –  Will Apr 17 '13 at 16:56
1  
I added an answer. –  juanchopanza Apr 17 '13 at 16:57
1  
@Will thanks for reply.! –  Kuan Apr 17 '13 at 17:03

3 Answers 3

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Since you are only declaring it as a class (i.e. you don't tell the compiler what the class contains), it is unable to create memory for it (it doesn't know how big it needs to be).

What you can do is define pointers to an A class:

int main(){
    A *a;
    // a->disp() is still invalid

    return 0;
}

but you won't be able to do anything with it.

This is exactly what headers are for!

A.h:

class A{
public:
    A(){}
    void disp();
};

A.cpp:

#include "A.h"
void A::disp(){
    cout<<"this is A disp()"<<endl;
}

After including a.h in a file, you will be able to create & use it as you would expect.

share|improve this answer
    
So generally, that means I can only use a pointer or refernce for an external forward declared class or type, right? –  Kuan Apr 17 '13 at 17:01
    
Pointers yes, references I'm not sure about, but I think you can't. Just imagine the class A; syntax as saying "when I say A I'm talking about a class, but I don't know more than that", and think what the compiler would reasonably be able to determine from that information. –  Dave Apr 17 '13 at 17:03
    
@Kuan and Dave, the rules for pointers and references are mostly identical and for the same reasons. –  Mark Ransom Apr 17 '13 at 17:08
    
@Kuan it also works for references, as long as you don't call any methods through them. –  juanchopanza Apr 17 '13 at 17:09
    
@All Can someone give me an example without header file? –  Kuan Apr 17 '13 at 17:11

When you only use a pointer to a class in another class declaration, only a forward declaration is needed. This means that only the class' name is known at that point but not the definition of its members, or its size. The Type is incomplete.

When you actually want to use a membervariable or memberfunction, or when the class gets instantiated by an automatic variable or using new(), or the type gets used to declare a member in another class. The normal class declaration must done before that point, and the class definition must be known at that point so there must have been an include of the class definition in the same translation unit.

One example where it is useful: forward declaration usually gets used to circumvent circular class dependancy/inclusion. Where one class has members of a second class, that also has members of the first class. When one includes the other, and the other includes the one, problems occur. When you only use a forward declaration and postpone the actual inclusion to a later point, there is no circular inclusion anymore.

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But I wonder why it works very well, if I write A in main.cpp? –  Kuan Apr 17 '13 at 17:05
    
@Kuan By doing that you are effectively creating a file that looks the same to the compiler as the one using the #include does after the preprocessor is run. –  Will Apr 17 '13 at 17:14
    
if you mean by "write A" give the definition later in the same file as main. Then the definition is in the same translation unit and the compiler can find the definition at that point. When the definition is not in the same file or included anywhere, the compiler can only find the name and will only know the incomplete type given by the forward declaration –  Emile Vrijdags Apr 17 '13 at 17:17
    
@Emile Vrijdags #include <iostream> #include <list> class A; int main(){ A::AiLst lst; return 0; } class A{ public: A(); int i; typedef std::list<int> AiLst; }; A::A():i(0){} But I wonder why this still not work? –  Kuan Apr 17 '13 at 18:06
    
My fault.. I wasn't completely correct. The declaration must be before using the class in that way, not only the forward declaration. The definition of the member functions can come after using the class, but in the same translation unit. Example: pastebin.com/GDjWEAqB –  Emile Vrijdags Apr 17 '13 at 19:05

main needs to know the size of class A, and that it has a member function disp(). For this reason, must have access to the class declaration. Put it in a file A.h (with include guards and no using namespace std), and include that in main.cpp.

file A.h

#ifndef A_H_
#define A_H_

#include <iostream>

class A
{
    public:
    A(){}
    void disp() const { 
      std::cout<<"this is A disp()"<<std::endl;
    }
};

#endif

main.cpp:

#include "A.h"

int main() { .... }

Note that you could decide to put the implementation of void A::disp() in an A.cpp file instead of in the header.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, so sorry that I forget to point out, I just want to figure out how to do in this way. –  Kuan Apr 17 '13 at 16:56

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