Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'd like to have an HTML page which displays a single PNG or JPEG image. I want the image to take up the whole screen but when I do this:

<img src="whatever.jpeg" width="100%" height="100%" />

It just stretches the image and messes up the aspect ratio. How do I solve this so the image has the correct aspect ratio while scaling to the maximum size possible ?


The solution posted by Wayne almost works except for the case where you have a tall image and a wide window. This code is a slight modification of his code which does what I want:

<html>
<head>
<script>
function resizeToMax(id){
    myImage = new Image() 
    var img = document.getElementById(id);
    myImage.src = img.src; 
    if(myImage.width / document.body.clientWidth > myImage.height / document.body.clientHeight){
        img.style.width = "100%";
    } else {
        img.style.height = "100%";
    }
}
</script>
</head>
<body>
<img id="image" src="test.gif" onload="resizeToMax(this.id)">
</body>
</html>
share|improve this question
    
does this use of clientWidth work in firefox etc or is it an IE only property? –  frankster Apr 28 '11 at 12:22

7 Answers 7

up vote 12 down vote accepted

Here's a quick function that will adjust the height or width to 100% depending on which is bigger. Tested in FF3, IE7 & Chrome

<html>
<head>
<script>
function resizeToMax(id){
    myImage = new Image() 
    var img = document.getElementById(id);
    myImage.src = img.src; 
    if(myImage.width > myImage.height){
    	img.style.width = "100%";
    } else {
    	img.style.height = "100%";
    }
}
</script>
</head>
<body>
<img id="image" src="test.gif" onload="resizeToMax(this.id)">
</body>
</html>
share|improve this answer
    
This code almost works except in the case where the image is tall and the window is wide. I have made a small modification to it (which I have added onto the original question) to take the window size into account and it now does what I want. Thank you. –  Adam Pierce Oct 2 '08 at 3:20
    
don't you need to set the other aspect to 'auto' for this to work? or is that assumed to be the default? –  Steven A. Lowe Oct 2 '08 at 3:25
    
Auto is the default. It's the same as not setting the property. –  Wayne Oct 2 '08 at 3:37
1  
Yes, so if you were to do this dynamically you would also want to ensure that you set the other property to auto to override the already set 100% on the other aspect. –  Sphvn Jul 13 '12 at 13:50

You don't necessarily want to stretch in a certain direction based on which is bigger. For example, I have a widescreen monitor, so even if it's a wider image than it is tall, stretching it left-to-right may still clip the top and bottom edges off.

You need to calculate the ratio between the window width and height and the image width and height. The smaller one is your controlling axis - the other is dependent. This is true even if both axes are larger than the respective window length.

<script type="text/javascript">
// <![CDATA[
function resizeToMax (id) {
    var img = document.getElementById(id);
    myImage = new Image();
    myImage.src = img.src;
    if (window.innerWidth / myImage.width < window.innerHeight / myImage.height) {
        img.style.width = "100%";
    } else {
        img.style.height = "100%";
    }
}
// ]]>
</script>
share|improve this answer

Try this:

<img src="whatever.jpeg" width="100%" height="auto" />
share|improve this answer
1  
That works if the page is taller than the image but does not work if the image is taller than the page, so it's not quite solving my problem. –  Adam Pierce Oct 2 '08 at 2:53

It is also possible to do this with pure CSS using a background image and the background-size:contain property:

<head>
<style>
#bigPicture
{
    width:100%;
    height:100%;
    background:url(http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/4/44/CatLolCatExample.jpg);
    background-size:contain;
    background-repeat:no-repeat;
    background-position:center;
}
</style>
</head>

<body style="margin:0px">
    <div id="bigPicture">
    </div>
</body>

This has the benefit of automatically updating if the container changes aspect ratios, without having to respond to resize events (the Javascript methods, as coded here, can result in cutting off the image when the user resizes the browser). The <embed> method has the same benefit, but CSS is much smoother and has no issues with security warnings.

Caveats:

  • No <img> element means no context menu and no alt text.
  • IE support for background-size:contain is 9+ only, and I couldn't even get this to work in IE9 (for unknown reasons).
  • It seems like all the background-* properties have to be specified in the same CSS block as the background image, so multiple images on the same page will each need their own contain, no-repeat, and center.
share|improve this answer

To piggyback on Franci Penov, yes you just want to set one of them. If you have a wide picture, you want to set width to 100% and leave height. If you have a long picture, you want to set height to 100% and leave width.

share|improve this answer

For this, JavaScript is your friend. What you want to do, is on page load, walk through the dom, and for every image (or alterantively, pass a function an image id if it's just a single image) check if which attribute of the image is greater, it's height or width.

This is the IMAGE itself, not the tag.

Once you got that, then set the corresponding height/width on the tag to 100% and the other to auto

some helpful code--all from off the top of my head, so your mileage may vary on the syntax..

var imgTag = $('myImage'); 
var imgPath = imgTag.src; 
var img = new Image(); 
img.src = imgPath; 
var mywidth = img.width; 
var myheight = img.height;

As an aside, this would be a much easier task on the server side of things. On the server, you could literally change the size of the image that's getting streamed down tot he browser.

share|improve this answer

Tested on IE and Firefox, plus the first line will center image:

<div align="center">
<embed src="image.gif" height="100%">

... also great to preserve aspect ratio with any other size value, so no more annoying calculations =)

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.