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This is in context with Objective C. I have 3 classes. ClassA, ClassB and ClassC.

ClassB and ClassC are subclasses of ClassA.

@interface ClassB : ClassA
@interface ClassC : ClassA

I need to make a check in classA, whether or not self is a ClassB or ClassC.

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1  
Class Introspection hmm? – Anoop Vaidya Apr 17 '13 at 18:13
    
if ([self className] isEqualToString:@"ClassA") or if( [self isKindOfClass:ClassA]) – Anoop Vaidya Apr 17 '13 at 18:18
2  
@AnoopVaidya, why create strings first? – vikingosegundo Apr 17 '13 at 18:18
2  
I think this will break with class clusters. @AnoopVaidya – vikingosegundo Apr 17 '13 at 18:22
1  
@AnoopVaidya Thanks for your answer. Was just reading your blog. Great stuff. – CalZone Apr 18 '13 at 6:04
up vote 21 down vote accepted

I need to...

No, you don't. If a base class requires knowledge about its subclasses, then you have made a huge design mistake.


Anyway, this is how to check for being in a specific subclass:

if ([self isKindOfClass:[ClassB class]]) {
    // Class B
} else if ([self isKindOfClass:[ClassC class]]) {
    // Class C
}
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4  
The above-the-fold bit is quite correct. Subclass-specific behavior should go into the subclass. The subclass can always call up to super in an overridden method. – Josh Caswell Apr 17 '13 at 18:15
    
@JoshCaswell Yes, exactly. Unfortunately, lot of beginners and not-so-beginners don't realize this. – user529758 Apr 17 '13 at 18:17
3  
That was exactly my doubt. This solution is valid if ClassB and ClassC are not subclasses. If I have to import them in base class, that defeats purpose of inheritance. +1 for clearing my doubt. – CalZone Apr 17 '13 at 18:22
    
@diabloSharma Exactly. You're welcome. – user529758 Apr 17 '13 at 18:24

I need to make a check in classA, whether or not self is a ClassB or ClassC.

A better way to do that is to call some abstract method that can be defined in your subclasses:

ClassA:

- (void)doThing
{
    [self doSpecializedThing];
}

- (void)doSpecializedThing
{
    return;
}

ClassB:

- (void)doSpecializedThing
{
    // ClassB's specialized version of whatever ClassA needs to do
}

ClassC:

- (void)doSpecializedThing
{
    // ClassC's specialized version of whatever ClassA needs to do
}

This prevents ClassA from having to know anything specific about its subclasses, as that's pretty much always a bad idea.

You can also override -doThing in ClassB and ClassC and have them call [super doThing] in their implementation. That's not necessarily the right solution in every case, though, such as when the code in ClassA's -doThing relies on some behavior in the subclasses (e.g. if -doSpecializedThing were to return a value used in -doThing).

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1  
And as @Josh-Caswell points out, you can call [super doSpecializedThing] from the subclass to do whatever's in ClassA's implementation. – Aaron Brager Apr 17 '13 at 18:19
    
@AaronBrager Yes, of course, but that's not always the most desirable solution. – Caleb Apr 17 '13 at 18:24
if([self isKindOfClass:[ClassB class]]){
     ...
}
else if ([self isKindOfClass:[ClassC class]])
{

}

Hope this helps...

As H2CO3 said, bring that subclass specific behavior into the subclass itself.

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My solution in one string is:

//Do not use this class. Use subclass instead ASSERT([NSStringFromClass([self class]) isEqualToString:@"SDDocumentsViewController"]==NO);

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