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I would like to write a bash script to extract a field in the last row of a table. I will illustrate by example. I have a text file containing tables with space delimited fields like ...

Table 1 (foobar)
num  flag  name   comments
1    ON    Frank  this guy is frank
2    OFF   Sarah  she is tall
3    ON    Ahmed  who knows him

Table 2 (foobar)
num  flag  name   comments
1    ON    Mike   he is short
2    OFF   Ahmed  his name is listed twice

I want to extract the first field in the last row of Table1, which is 3. Ideally I would like to be able to use any given table's title to do this. There are guaranteed carriage returns between each table. What would be the best way to accomplish this, preferably using sed and grep?

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3  
Why do you want to use sed and grep? awk is made to do this kind of thing. –  Carl Norum Apr 17 '13 at 18:46
    
Mostly for learning purposes but also for consistency's sake. And also so it can be ported to machine's that don't necessarily have awk. –  user2150250 Apr 17 '13 at 18:54

4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Awk is perfect for this, print the first field in the last row for each record:

$ awk '!$1{print a}{a=$1}END{print a}' file
3
2

Just from the first record:

$ awk '!$1{print a;exit}{a=$1}' file
3

Edit:

For a given table title:

$ awk -v t="Table 1" '$0~t{f=1}!$1&&f{print a;f=0}{a=$1}END{if (f) print a}' file
3

$ awk -v t="Table 2" '$0~t{f=1}!$1&&f{print a;f=0}{a=$1}END{if (f) print a}' file
2
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2  
+1 for the "right" answer. –  Carl Norum Apr 17 '13 at 18:51
    
+1 indeed, though the perfect answer wouldn't hardcode the 3-column requirement :-) Can't think of an elegant way yet though! –  cmbuckley Apr 17 '13 at 19:01
    
@cbuckley I'd do $ awk '!$1{print a}{a=$1}END{print a}' file –  iiSeymour Apr 17 '13 at 19:13
    
@sudo_O brutal. –  cmbuckley Apr 17 '13 at 19:15
    
@sudo_O You beat me to the punch and posted your 2nd answer as I was editing my problem description. I was just mentioning that the number of fields should be dynamic because of this comments field having spaces. Thanks for your excellent answer! –  user2150250 Apr 17 '13 at 19:19

This sed line seems to work for your sample.

table='Table 2'
sed -n "/$table"'/{n;n;:next;h;n;/^$/b last;$b last;b next;:last;g;s/^\s*\(\S*\).*/\1/p;}' file

Explanation: When we find a line matching the table name in $table, we skip that line, and the next (the field labels). Starting at :next we push the current line into the hold space, get the next line and see if it is blank or the end of the file, if not we go back to :next, push the current line into hold and get another. If it is blank or EOF, we skip to :last, pull the hold space (the last line of the table) into pattern space, chop out all but the first field and print it.

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Wowwwww ... I'd like to give this one a +2 for solving this using sed. I can definitely see why awk is the preferred method in this problem's case. –  user2150250 Apr 17 '13 at 19:28
    
I'm a big fan of sed, but awk is usually better for this kind of thing. Still, it's fun to try to make sed do it. –  William Apr 17 '13 at 19:36

Just read each block as a record with each line as a field and then print the first sub-field of the last field of whichever record you care about:

$ awk -v RS= -F'\n' '/^Table 1/{split($NF,a," "); print a[1]}' file
3

$ awk -v RS= -F'\n' '/^Table 2/{split($NF,a," "); print a[1]}' file
2
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Better tool to that is awk!
Here is a kind legible code:

awk '{
    if(NR==1) {
        row=$0;
        next;
    }

    if($0=="") {
        $0=row;
        print $1;
    } else {
        row=$0;
    }
} END {
    if(row!="") {
        $0=row;
        print $1;
    }
}' input.txt
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downvote deserves at least a comment –  jyz Apr 17 '13 at 19:01
    
I agree. Wasn't me though. Thank you for your answer anyways. –  user2150250 Apr 17 '13 at 19:21
2  
Wasn't me either, but the awk community are a picky bunch; it seems the terser the better. (EDIT: found the article I was looking for.) –  cmbuckley Apr 17 '13 at 19:24
    
I agree with jyzuz. People often down-vote without giving a reason. –  Hai Vu Apr 17 '13 at 19:31
    
@user2150250 From the question I undestood that you want to print the first field of the last row of all the tables, isn't so? –  jyz Apr 17 '13 at 19:46

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