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Since you can't use a calculated column in a where-clause in MySQL like this:

SELECT a,b,c,(a*b+c) AS d FROM table
WHERE d > n
ORDER by d

you have to use

SELECT a,b,c,(a*b+c) AS d FROM table
WHERE (a*b+c) > n
ORDER by d

Is the calculation (in that example "(a*b+c)" executed once per row or twice? Is there a way to make it faster? I find it strange it's possible to ORDER on the column but not to have a WHERE-clause.

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up vote 17 down vote accepted

You can use HAVING to filter on a computed column:

SELECT a,b,c,(a*b+c) AS d, n FROM table
HAVING d > n
ORDER by d

Note that you need to include n in the SELECT clause for this to work.

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that's great thanks! Is it performance-wise better / equal / worse than repeating the formula in a WHERE-clause? The readability is better of course :) – Raphael Jeger Apr 17 '13 at 19:42
    
It's possible that the mysql optimizer is able to detect that the WHERE and SELECT formulas are the same, and not calculate it twice. But given mysql's track record, I doubt it. Benchmark it and see. – Barmar Apr 17 '13 at 19:44
    
FYI: It appears that this solution only works for MySQL, and nor SQL Server. – Tom Collins Jul 4 '15 at 19:57

You could do this:

SELECT a,b,c,d FROM 
(SELECT a,b,c,(a*b+c) AS d) AS tmp
WHERE d > n
ORDER BY d

But I am not sure what performance implications it could have.

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1  
Will this even work? There's no n column in the subquery. – Barmar Apr 17 '13 at 19:45
    
n comes from the query in the initial question, I guess the poster meant by n some value. If not, the subquery should be replaced with (SELECT a,b,c,(a*b+c) AS d,n) AS tmp – Walid Apr 17 '13 at 19:47

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