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I am going to be implementing an enterprise-wide logging solution. This will be a webservice, that will take all an exception and write details about that exception to a database somewhere. That way, we can have all of the logging information for each application logging to a centralized place to make monitoring our applications a little bit simpler. I will be using a logging monitoring front-end application as well (most likely Chainsaw, but I am looking for a web front end, but I digress)...

I have a couple of rookie questions here. From reading all of the documentation, when you are attempting to log something you would do something like this...

import org.apache.log4j.Logger;
import org.apache.log4j.PropertyConfigurator;

public class Log4jJDBCExample
{
    static Logger log = Logger.getLogger(Log4jJDBCExample.class);

    public static void main(String[] args)
    {
        PropertyConfigurator.configure("log4j.properties");

        log.debug("Sample debug message");
        log.info("Sample info message");
        log.error("Sample error message");
        log.fatal("Sample fatal message");
    }
}

I obviously need a log4j.properties file or this thing won't work. So I would do this...

# Define the root logger with file appender
log4j.rootLogger = DEBUG, sql

# Define the file appender
log4j.appender.sql=org.apache.log4j.jdbc.JDBCAppender
log4j.appender.sql.URL=jdbc:mysql://localhost/test
# Set Database Driver
log4j.appender.sql.driver=com.mysql.jdbc.Driver
# Set database user name and password
log4j.appender.sql.user=root
log4j.appender.sql.password=password
# Set the SQL statement to be executed.
log4j.appender.sql.sql=INSERT INTO LOGS VALUES ('%x', now() ,'%C','%p','%m')
# Define the xml layout for file appender
log4j.appender.sql.layout=org.apache.log4j.PatternLayout

I am basically just pulling this code from this site btw... enter link description here(which is a pretty clear tutorial if any one would like to check it out).

Which is great. But this is implementation is going to be sitting behind a Web service. I will get the user to send the class type and the Error (Informational etc) message as a string as part of the web payload, I also want to record the username, stack trace(if there is one) and the applicationID and that will also be part of the web service payload that I will attempt to write to the database.

Obviously I will need to do a little bit of extending here. In the example above the author created a table

CREATE TABLE LOGS
(
USER_ID VARCHAR(20) NOT NULL,
DATED   DATETIME NOT NULL,
LOGGER  VARCHAR(50) NOT NULL,
LEVEL   VARCHAR(10) NOT NULL,
MESSAGE VARCHAR(1000) NOT NULL
);

I would change that table a little bit. I would need to add ClassName, ApplicationID, and StackTrace to that table. So this would suite my needs a little better.

CREATE TABLE LOGS
(
USER_ID VARCHAR2(20) NOT NULL,
DATED   DATETIME NOT NULL,
LOGGER  VARCHAR2(50) NOT NULL,
LEVEL   VARCHAR2(10) NOT NULL,
MESSAGE VARCHAR2(1000) NOT NULL,
    CLASSNAME VARCHAR2(100) NOT NULL,
    ApplicationID INT NOT NULL,
    STACKTRACE VARCHAR2(4000 BYTE)
);

I would have another table which would be an AN Application Table which would store the application name and other vital application details. The stack trace would be nullable.
Obviously, I would need to change this statement so I logging the rest of this.

log4j.appender.sql.sql=INSERT INTO LOGS VALUES ('%x', now() ,'%C','%p','%m')

Couple of questions:

1) I am slightly confused on all it would take to extend log4J to do this. I obviously need to extend the JDBCAppender and probably an appender. So I capture all that info. I have been looking at Apache's documentation, but it is not really clear what to do and whether configuration via config file or extending the class is the way to go?

2) A little unclear as to whether or not I can pass in the name of the object into the getLogger Factory function and expect this thing to work still. Some one is going to call my service and pass in the name of the class that caused the exception exception. I am not certain that will work. I am assuming that classes that get built with the Logger need to be in the classpath or in the Java project for this thing not to throw some weird exception? Is that about correct? If that is the case, I am not certain log4J would be a good tool to use for this project.

3) Kind of noob Java project question. When I import the Log4J jar into my project all of a sudden my project will no longer publish to my local server. I added the jar as an external jar to my project and that project is a Utility Jar in the EAR that is being published. That project is also a Utility Module (added it as a facet for that project). I am probably doing something stupid. Please feel free to harshly let me know what it is.

4) Do you recommend a good front end for this? Chainsaw seems like a windows thick client, which is fine for my purposes now, but I would have like a nice web front-end better for this project. If you have one in mind please feel free to share.

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3  
You will write a web-service that receives log data from clients and writes it to database. For the web-service, this is functional data, not logging info. It seems log4j is not appropriate here, just parse the data and write it to db. –  Miserable Variable Apr 17 '13 at 19:52
    
Why not use the JDK's Logging API? It's powerful, highly customizable and alleviates the need for yet another third party library in your application... –  Zack Macomber Apr 17 '13 at 19:56
1  
I think logging synchronously to a database is a bad idea. I'd rather write to file and have an external job put the records in the database. Have you considered splunk? –  NilsH Apr 17 '13 at 20:14
1  
I worked on a system once where users were complaining about downtime. But the logs showed no significant errors. The downtime was coming from network failures, and the network failures prevented error messages from reaching the database. :) (because the logs were on the database.) The system had a failover to write errors to disk, but nobody knew to look there. –  Robert Pappas Apr 17 '13 at 20:31
1  
I have came across such situation once in our project and we settled with what MV is referring to. Capture the information and put it in DB using some ORM tool. Log4J is not appropriate here. –  lokesh Apr 18 '13 at 3:20

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