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I'm looking into the possibilities to do TDD with TypeScript. If I write my tests in TypeScript, is it possible to make the import statements return mocks for my class under test? Or is the only feasible approach to write the tests in pure javascript and deal with injecting AMDs myself?

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I use infuse.js for Dependency Injection in TypeScript.

Reference the d.ts

/// <reference path="definition/infusejs/infusejs.d.ts"/>

Initialize your injector at startup

this.injector = new infuse.Injector();  

Map Dependencies

this.injector.mapClass( 'TodoController', TodoController );
this.injector.mapClass( 'TodoView', TodoView );
this.injector.mapClass( 'TodoModel', TodoModel, true );  // 'true' Map as singleton

Inject Dependencies

export class TodoController
{
    static inject = ['TodoView', 'TodoModel'];

    constructor( todoView:TodoView, todoModel:TodoModel )
    {

    }
 }

It's string based as opposed to being type based (as reflection isn't yet possible in TypeScript). Despite that, it works very well in my applications.

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As per the discussion here, reflection is not likely to ever make an appearance in Typescript. – Michel Carroll Sep 21 '15 at 1:36

Try this Dependency Injector (Typejector)

GitHub Typejector

With new TypeScript 1.5 it is possible using annotation way

For example

    @injection
    class SingletonClass {
        public cat: string = "Kitty";
        public dog: string = "Hot";

        public say() {
            alert(`${this.cat}-Cat and ${this.dog}-Dog`);
        }
    }
    @injection
    class SimpleClass {
        public say(something: string) {
            alert(`You said ${something}?`);
        }
    }

    @resolve
    class NeedInjectionsClass {
        @inject(SingletonClass)
        public helper: SingletonClass;
        @inject(SimpleClass)
        public simpleHelper: SimpleClass;

        constructor() {
            this.helper.say();
            this.simpleHelper.say("wow");
        }
    }
    class ChildClass extends NeedInjectionsClass {

    }

    var needInjection = new ChildClass();

For question case: some property should realise pseudo Interface (or abstract class) like in next example.

    class InterfaceClass {
        public cat: string;
        public dog: string;

        public say() {

        }
    }

    @injection(true, InterfaceClass)
    class SingletonClass extends InterfaceClass {
        public cat: string = "Kitty";
        public dog: string = "Hot";

        public say() {
            alert(`${this.cat}-Cat and ${this.dog}-Dog`);
        }
    }

    @injection(true, InterfaceClass)
    class MockInterfaceClass extends InterfaceClass {
        public cat: string = "Kitty";
        public dog: string = "Hot";

        public say() {
            alert(`Mock-${this.cat}-Cat and Mock-${this.dog}-Dog`);
        }
    }

    @injection
    class SimpleClass {
        public say(something: string) {
            alert(`You said ${something}?`);
        }
    }

    @resolve
    class NeedInjectionsClass {
        @inject(InterfaceClass)
        public helper: InterfaceClass;
        @inject(SimpleClass)
        public simpleHelper: SimpleClass;

        constructor() {
            this.helper.say();
            this.simpleHelper.say("wow");
        }
    }

    class ChildClass extends NeedInjectionsClass {

    }

    var needInjection = new ChildClass();

Note: Mock injection should define after source code, because it mast redefine class-creator for interface

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2  
While this link may answer the question, it is better to include the essential parts of the answer here and provide the link for reference. Link-only answers can become invalid if the linked page changes – abarisone May 12 '15 at 11:57

I have developed an IoC container called InversifyJS with advanced dependency injection features like contextual bindings.

You need to follow 3 basic steps to use it:

1. Add annotations

The annotation API is based on Angular 2.0:

import { injectable, inject } from "inversify";

@injectable()
class Katana implements IKatana {
    public hit() {
        return "cut!";
    }
}

@injectable()
class Shuriken implements IShuriken {
    public throw() {
        return "hit!";
    }
}

@injectable()
class Ninja implements INinja {

    private _katana: IKatana;
    private _shuriken: IShuriken;

    public constructor(
        @inject("IKatana") katana: IKatana,
        @inject("IShuriken") shuriken: IShuriken
    ) {
        this._katana = katana;
        this._shuriken = shuriken;
    }

    public fight() { return this._katana.hit(); };
    public sneak() { return this._shuriken.throw(); };

}

2. Declare bindings

The binding API is based on Ninject:

import { Kernel } from "inversify";

import { Ninja } from "./entities/ninja";
import { Katana } from "./entities/katana";
import { Shuriken} from "./entities/shuriken";

var kernel = new Kernel();
kernel.bind<INinja>("INinja").to(Ninja);
kernel.bind<IKatana>("IKatana").to(Katana);
kernel.bind<IShuriken>("IShuriken").to(Shuriken);

export default kernel;

3. Resolve dependencies

The resolution API is based on Ninject:

import kernel = from "./inversify.config";

var ninja = kernel.get<INinja>("INinja");

expect(ninja.fight()).eql("cut!"); // true
expect(ninja.sneak()).eql("hit!"); // true

The latest release (2.0.0) supports many use cases:

  • Kernel modules
  • Kernel middleware
  • Use classes, string literals or Symbols as dependency identifiers
  • Injection of constant values
  • Injection of class constructors
  • Injection of factories
  • Auto factory
  • Injection of providers (async factory)
  • Activation handlers (used to inject proxies)
  • Multi injections
  • Tagged bindings
  • Custom tag decorators
  • Named bindings
  • Contextual bindings
  • Friendly exceptions (e.g. Circular dependencies)

You can learn more about it at https://github.com/inversify/InversifyJS

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TypeScript works well with AMD loaders like requirejs. If confgured properly, TypeScript will output fully AMD compliant javascript.

In a testing situation, you could configure requirejs to inject testable modules.

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But is there a way to do that injection without stepping outside of my TypeScript bubble? – Sop Killen Apr 17 '13 at 20:45
    
Depends on what you mean, I guess... Every bit of "javascript" in my application that I generated from TypeScript that I wrote. The goal for most of my applications these days is to use only TypeScript. But I don't exactly know what you're asking here. – Alex Dresko Apr 17 '13 at 20:48
    
Ok, I was a little bit unclear there. I'm trying to wrap my head around the duality of JS and TS. Suppose I have a class B taking in a module A: import A = module('/path/to/A'); class B { // methods using A } Is it possible to provide a mock for module A while still letting the test be in TypeScript with full code completion? – Sop Killen Apr 17 '13 at 21:10
    
Probably. Describe your test environment... – Alex Dresko Apr 17 '13 at 21:26
    
Currently, for pure JS, I'm using Jasmine + RequireJS with Sinon for the mocks. – Sop Killen Apr 17 '13 at 21:46

I work on AutoFixtureTS that is inspired by AutoFixture. AutoFixtureTS makes it easier for TypeScript developers to do Test-Driven Development by automating non-relevant Test Fixture Setup, allowing the Test Developer to focus on the essentials of each test case.

http://ronniehegelund.github.io/AutoFixtureTS/

Its still just prototype code, but check it out :-)

/ronnie

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