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If I run

SELECT somecolumn FROM sometable GROUP BY somecolumn HAVING count(*) > 1;

the output will have values for somecolumn that appear more than once in sometable.

But I want to see the rows (or parts of them) where these repeated values appear. E.g., if foo and bar are names for the other columns from sometable that are of interest, the first few rows of the output may look something like

 somecolumn |  foo   |  bar
-------------------------------
 123        | foo_1  | bar_2
 123        | foo_3  | bar_5
 123        | foo_7  | bar_11
 234        | foo_13 | bar_17
 234        | foo_19 | bar_23
...

etc.

How can I achieve this?

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Which rdbms are you using? –  bonsvr Apr 17 '13 at 20:32
    
postgres````````` –  kjo Apr 17 '13 at 20:34
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2 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

For a database agnostic solution, you can do this:

SELECT *
FROM sometable S
WHERE somecolumn IN (   SELECT somecolumn 
                        FROM sometable 
                        GROUP BY somecolumn 
                        HAVING count(*) > 1)

For SQL Server 2005+, you can do this:

;WITH CTE AS
(
    SELECT  *,
            N = COUNT(*) OVER(PARTITION BY somecolumn)
    FROM sometable
)
SELECT *
FROM CTE
WHERE N > 1
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You need to add those column to the selection as well as the grouping

SELECT 
    somecolumn, 
    foo, 
    bar 
FROM 
    sometable 
GROUP BY 
    somecolumn, 
    foo, 
    bar 
HAVING count(*) > 1;
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2  
This isn't what op wants. S/he wants to know the values for the other columns when only somecolumn is duplicated –  Lamak Apr 17 '13 at 20:22
    
I see what you mean.. didn't read the question that way initially.. –  Gaby aka G. Petrioli Apr 17 '13 at 20:34
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