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I personally like the 'exclusive or' operator when it makes sense in context of boolean checks because of its conciseness. I much prefer to write

if (boolean1 ^ boolean2)
{
  //do it
}

than

if((boolean1 && !boolean2) || (boolean2 && !boolean1))
{
  //do it
}

but I often get confused looks (from other experienced java developers, not just the newbies), and sometimes comments about how it should only be used for bitwise operations. I'm curious as to the best practices others use around the '^' operator.

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12 Answers 12

up vote 180 down vote accepted

What's wrong with !=?

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41  
This would give the incorrect result for false and false. –  Jeff Yates Oct 2 '08 at 4:16
57  
What incorrect result? false ^ false => false and false != false => false –  Peter Lawrey Apr 10 '10 at 8:54
21  
"What's wrong with !=" bool1 ^ bool2 ^ bool3 makes more logical sense to me than bool1 != bool2 != bool3 –  BlueRaja - Danny Pflughoeft May 5 '10 at 20:54
14  
@vemv, != yields correct results for booleans (but not for Booleans so be careful). It's not always pretty though, for example (some != null) != (other != null) isn't very readable. You either have to extract the parts in explicit booleans, or extract the != in a separate method. –  ivant Dec 22 '11 at 12:52
6  
Here's why: a ^ b => "a or b but not both", a != b => "a is not equal to b". (What @RobertGrant said). Most humans would understand the first one easier if they know what xor is (which is pretty useful to know if you're in the field of computing...) –  Harold R. Eason Nov 22 '13 at 20:53

I think you've answered your own question - if you get strange looks from people, it's probably safer to go with the more explicit option.

If you need to comment it, then you're probably better off replacing it with the more verbose version and not making people ask the question in the first place.

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5  
Because all good programming practices and patterns are already discovered and well-known? -1. –  djechlin Feb 27 at 17:07

I find that I have similar conversations a lot. On the one hand, you have a compact, efficient method of achieving your goal. On the other hand, you have something that the rest of your team might not understand, making it hard to maintain in the future.

My general rule is to ask if the technique being used is something that it is reasonable to expect programmers in general to know. In this case, I think that it is reasonable to expect programmers to know how to use boolean operators, so using xor in an if statement is okay.

As an example of something that wouldn't be okay, take the trick of using xor to swap two variable without using a temp variable. That is a trick that I wouldn't expect everybody to be familiar with, so it wouldn't pass code review.

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Totally agree, communication is the key here. Also I think if someone doesn't know XOR (or not willing to learn it), they shouldn't really be near an IDE :) We learned that in primary school... –  TWiStErRob Aug 25 at 14:36

I'd think it'd be okay if you commented it.

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6  
Even a short comment like thefollowing should be fine: //^ = xor –  James A. N. Stauffer Oct 2 '08 at 16:01
10  
Absolutely. A programmer who cannot directly grasp XOR is perhaps in the wrong line of work. –  Svante Nov 27 '08 at 12:42

I recently used an xor in a JavaScript project at work and ended up adding 7 lines of comments to explain what was going on. The justification for using xor in that context was that one of the terms (term1 in the example below) could take on not two but three values: undefined, true or false while the other (term2) could be true or false. I would have had to add an additional check for the undefined cases but with xor, the following was sufficient since the xor forces the first term to be first evaluated as a Boolean, letting undefined get treated as false:

	if (term1 ^ term2) { ...

It was in the end a bit of an overkill but I wanted to keep it in there anyway, as sort of an easter egg.

@Martin: I think this is a good case for what you've already stated:

If you need to comment it, then you're probably better off replacing it with the more verbose version and not making people ask the question in the first place.

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Or, you could have if ( ((bool) term1) != term2 ) –  maxwellb Jul 12 '10 at 14:06
    
@maxwellb He said "JavaScript". –  0xF May 9 at 12:27
    
How about function isEitherTruthy(a, b) { /*comment here or JSDoc*/ return a ^ b; } or similar, you get the gist. –  TWiStErRob Aug 25 at 14:41
    
@TWiStErRob isEitherTruthyButNotBoth(a, b) –  Ates Goral Aug 25 at 16:48
1  
@AtesGoral that depends on your language background... so let's stick to safeXOR (safe meaning undefined-safe) ;) –  TWiStErRob Aug 25 at 17:14

If the usage pattern justifies it, why not? While your team doesn't recognize the operator right away, with time they could. Humans learn new words all the time. Why not in programming?

The only caution I might state is that "^" doesn't have the short circuit semantics of your second boolean check. If you really need the short circuit semantics, then a static util method works too.

public static boolean xor(boolean a, boolean b) {
    return (a && !b) || (b && !a);
}
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13  
I don't see any short circuiting possible with xor - you have to know both a and b to evaluate the result. –  Thelema Oct 2 '08 at 3:46
6  
Also, the arguments would be evaluated att call time, so no short-circuiting will happen whatsoever. –  erikkallen Jan 6 '09 at 10:25
3  
Additionally, xor should be a single operation at the machine level. –  Ogre Psalm33 Mar 18 '13 at 13:25
    
You should probably look up the difference between short-circuit evaluation and lazy evaluation. Short-curcuit evaluation is a code style that that prevents calls that would otherwise result in runtime errors, such as division by zero. In C this can be ´if (denominator != 0 && numerator / denominator)´, which in it self utilizes lazy evaluation to prevent division by zero. Your answer is also purely speculative. –  Martin Jun 19 '13 at 10:36

With code clarity in mind, my (subjective...) opinion is that using XOR in boolean checks is not typical usage for the XOR bitwise operator. From my experience bitwise XOR in Java is typically used to implement a mask flag toggle behaviour:

flags = flags ^ MASK;

This article by Vipan Singla explains the usage case more in detail.

Net, if you need to use bitwise XOR as in your example, comment why you use it, since it's likely to require even a bitwise literate audience to stop in their tracks to understand why you are using it.

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if((boolean1 && !boolean2) || (boolean2 && !boolean1)) 
{ 
  //do it 
} 

IMHO this code could be simplified:

if(boolean1 != boolean2) 
{ 
  //do it 
} 
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You could always just wrap it in a function to give it a verbose name:

public static boolean XOR(boolean A, boolean B) {
    return A ^ B;
}

But, it seems to me that it wouldn't be hard for anyone who didn't know what the ^ operator is for to Google it really quick. It's not going to be hard to remember after the first time. Since you asked for other uses, its common to use the XOR for bit masking.

You can also use XOR to swap the values in two variables without using a third temporary variable.

// Swap the values in A and B
A ^= B;
B ^= A;
A ^= B;
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As a bitwise operator, xor is much faster than any other means to replace it. So for performance critical and scalable calculations, xor is imperative.

My subjective personal opinion: It is absolutely forbidden, for any purpose, to use equality (== or !=) for booleans. Using it shows lack of basic programming ethics and fundamentals. Anyone who gives you confused looks over ^ should be sent back to the basics of boolean algebra (I was tempted to write "to the rivers of belief" here :) ).

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1  
Except that the JIT is extremely good at keyhole (little) optimizations, like replacing one boolean expression with another. –  David Leppik Nov 9 '11 at 17:00
1  
Also, ^ isn't primarily a Boolean (logic) operator, it's a bitwise operator. It tells the reader to slow down, because there are likely to be sign bugs. If you use ^ for !=, you're going to get really messed up if you ever program in C. Bitwise operators are a signal to your readers (those who debug your code, including you) to slow down and look for sign errors. And they can be tricky. For example, did you know that Java's % isn't true modulo, like in C or Python? I once had a snippet of code that ran the same in C, JavaScript, and Python, but not in Java. –  David Leppik Nov 9 '11 at 17:15
3  
How did this ever get upvoted? First of all, in Java XOR and != are compiled [stackoverflow.com/a/4175512/202504](to the exact same code), second even in assembler testing for equality and xor are single simple operations each. Do you have any numbers to back up your statement? –  jmiserez Nov 17 '13 at 13:42

!= is OK to compare two variables. It doesn't work, though, with multiple comparisons.

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str.contains("!=") ^ str.startsWith("not(")

looks better for me than

str.contains("!=") != str.startsWith("not(")
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